A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions Or High Official Rank: But Uninvested with Heritable Honours, Volume 3

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Colburn, 1836 - Great Britain
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Great resource. Was able to trace the Bedingfeld (Bedingfield) family history starting from the 1500s.

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Thomas Pennant's Journey from London to the Isle of Wight

Contents

II
1
III
3
IV
8
V
12
VI
15
VII
19
VIII
22
IX
26

X
30
XI
36
XII
39
XIII
42
XIV
44
XV
48
XVI
50
XVII
53
XVIII
56
XIX
59
XX
64
XXI
67
XXII
69
XXIII
73
XXIV
77
XXV
79
XXVI
85
XXVII
87
XXVIII
89
XXIX
94
XXX
97
XXXI
101
XXXII
102
XXXIII
104
XXXIV
107
XXXV
109
XXXVI
111
XXXVII
113
XXXVIII
116
XXXIX
117
XL
119
XLI
120
XLII
125
XLIII
127
XLIV
132
XLV
133
XLVI
137
XLVII
138
XLVIII
139
XLIX
140
L
141
LI
142
LII
146
LIII
147
LIV
152
LV
153
LVI
160
LVII
163
LVIII
170
LIX
173
LX
176
LXI
178
LXII
183
LXIII
186
LXIV
188
LXV
191
LXVI
194
LXVII
195
LXVIII
200
LXIX
207
LXX
211
LXXI
219
LXXII
221
LXXIII
223
LXXIV
227
LXXV
228
LXXVI
232
LXXVII
235
LXXVIII
238
LXXIX
241
LXXX
247
LXXXI
250
LXXXII
255
LXXXIII
257
LXXXIV
258
LXXXV
262
LXXXVI
265
LXXXVII
267
LXXXVIII
269
LXXXIX
274
XC
280
XCI
286
XCII
288
XCIII
290
XCIV
294
XCV
300
XCVI
303
XCVII
307
XCVIII
310
XCIX
312
C
313
CI
316
CII
319
CIII
322
CIV
326
CV
329
CVI
332
CVII
334
CVIII
336
CIX
339
CX
343
CXI
346
CXII
349
CXIII
351
CXIV
354
CXV
357
CXVI
359
CXVII
360
CXVIII
361
CXIX
363
CXX
365
CXXI
367
CXXII
370
CXXIII
372
CXXIV
375
CXXV
376
CXXVI
381
CXXVII
384
CXXVIII
386
CXXIX
388
CXXX
391
CXXXI
393
CXL
425
CXLI
427
CXLII
430
CXLIII
437
CXLIV
438
CXLV
446
CXLVI
449
CXLVII
453
CXLVIII
457
CXLIX
461
CL
462
CLI
466
CLII
469
CLIII
471
CLIV
472
CLV
475
CLVI
476
CLVII
485
CLVIII
486
CLIX
490
CLX
491
CLXI
495
CLXII
497
CLXIII
500
CLXIV
502
CLXV
504
CLXVI
506
CLXVII
508
CLXVIII
511
CLXIX
513
CLXX
515
CLXXI
518
CLXXII
520
CLXXIII
522
CLXXIV
525
CLXXV
528
CLXXVI
530
CLXXVII
533
CLXXVIII
534
CLXXIX
536
CLXXX
537
CLXXXI
541
CLXXXII
542
CLXXXIII
544
CLXXXIV
547
CLXXXV
548
CLXXXVI
552
CLXXXVII
553
CLXXXVIII
554
CLXXXIX
555
CXC
557
CXCI
559
CXCII
560
CXCIII
561
CXCIV
562
CXCV
566
CXCVI
572
CXCVII
575
CXCVIII
577
CXCIX
579
CC
580
CCI
582
CCII
585
CCIII
586
CCIV
587
CCV
590
CCVI
594
CCVII
598
CCVIII
600
CCIX
601
CCX
604
CCXI
605
CCXII
607
CCXIII
608
CCXIV
609
CCXV
610
CCXVI
611
CCXVII
613
CCXVIII
615
CCXIX
622
CCXX
624
CCXXI
625
CCXXII
627
CCXXIII
630
CCXXIV
631
CCXXV
633
CCXXVI
635
CCXXVII
636
CCXXVIII
637
CCXXIX
641
CCXXX
642
CCXXXI
643
CCXXXII
644
CCXXXIII
646
CCXXXIV
647
CCXXXV
649
CCXXXVI
651
CCXXXVII
654
CCXXXVIII
657
CCXXXIX
661
CCXL
665
CCXLI
668
CCXLII
669
CCXLIII
670
CCXLIV
671
CCXLV
672
CCXLVI
674
CCXLVII
675
CCXLVIII
677
CCXLIX
678
CCL
682
CCLI
683
CCLII
684
CCLIII
687
CCLIV
689
CCLV
691
CCLVI
692
CCLVII
693
CCLVIII
698
CCLIX
699
CCLX
700
CCLXI
702

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 637 - Ericks, who derive their lineage from Erick the forester, a great commander, who raised an army to oppose the invasion of William the Conqueror, by whom he was vanquished, but afterward employed to command that prince's forces ; and in his old age retired to his house in Leicestershire, where his family hath continued ever since, but declining every age, and are now in the condition of very private gentlemen.
Page 57 - In publishing the following ballad, the copy principally resorted to is one, apparently of considerable antiquity, which was found among the papers...
Page 584 - Such was the exterior of a man who was the charm of the circle, and gave a zest to every company he came into. His pleasantry was of a sort peculiar to himself; it harmonized with every thing ; it was like the bread to...
Page 459 - A Letter sent by sir John Suckling from France, deploring his sad estate and flight : with a discoverie of the plot and conspiracie, intended by him and his adherents against England.
Page 271 - He was a man of integrity and benevolence, but subject to strange fits of hypochondriac melancholy, which rendered his conduct flighty and inconsistent. Sometimes he was an agreeable and lively companion, delighting those around him with perpetual sallies of wit and...
Page 373 - (cows). Accordingly, he sounded his bugle, set out with his followers, and next day returned with a bow of kye, and a bassend (brindled) bull. On his return with this gallant prey, he passed a very large haystack. It occurred to the provident laird that this would be extremely convenient to fodder his new stock of cattle ; but as no means of transporting it were obvious, he was fain to take leave of it with the apostrophe, now become proverbial — "By my saul, had ye but four feet ye should not...
Page 582 - Miss Jennings, adorned with all the blooming treasures of youth, had the fairest and brightest complexion that ever was seen : her hair was of a most beauteous flaxen : there was something particularly lively and animated in her countenance, which preserved her from that insipidity which is frequently an attendant on a complexion so extremely fair.
Page 493 - had the success of a conqueror, in establishing and defending his colony among savage tribes, without ever drawing the sword ; the goodness of the most benevolent...
Page 459 - Warton, in a note to his Essay on Pope, relates the story somewhat differently. " Sir John Suckling was robbed by his valet-de-chambre : the moment he discovered it, he clapped on his boots in a passionate hurry, and perceived not a large rusty nail that was concealed at the bottom, which pierced his heel, and brought on a mortification.
Page 482 - His tenants had lost, in that severe winter, above a third of their cattle, which constituted their substance; their spirits were soured by their losses, and the late augmentations of rent ; and their ideas of America were inflamed by the strongest representations, and the example of their neighbouring clans. My friend and I were empowered to grant such deductions in the rents as might seem necessary and reasonable ; but we found it terrible to decide between the justice to creditors, the necessities...

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