Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Feb 5, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 400 pages
575 Reviews
“Have mercy on me, Lord, I am Cuban.” In 1962, Carlos Eire was one of 14,000 children airlifted out of Havana—exiled from his family, his country, and his own childhood by Fidel Castro’s revolution. This stunning memoir is a vibrant and evocative look at Latin America from a child’s unforgettable experience.

Waiting for Snow in Havana is both an exorcism and an ode to a paradise lost. For the Cuba of Carlos’s youth—with its lizards and turquoise seas and sun-drenched siestas—becomes an island of condemnation once a cigar-smoking guerrilla named Fidel Castro ousts President Batista on January 1, 1959. Suddenly the music in the streets sounds like gunfire. Christmas is made illegal, political dissent leads to imprisonment, and too many of Carlos’s friends are leaving Cuba for a place as far away and unthinkable as the United States. Carlos will end up there, too, and fulfill his mother’s dreams by becoming a modern American man—even if his soul remains in the country he left behind.

Narrated with the urgency of a confession, Waiting for Snow in Havana is a eulogy for a native land and a loving testament to the collective spirit of Cubans everywhere.
  

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User ratings

5 stars
173
4 stars
203
3 stars
107
2 stars
58
1 star
34

Very interesting style of writing. - Goodreads
The prose got old and overly bitter. - Goodreads
The most interesting style of writing I have ever read. - Goodreads
A beautiful writer - yes. - Goodreads
Didn't like the writing style. - Goodreads
Eire's prose is lyrical, haunting, and achingly honest. - Goodreads

Review: Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy

User Review  - Elsie Militar - Goodreads

Struggled through 100 or so pages. The writing was trying way too hard and the story couldn't save it. I was too bored to go any further. Read full review

Review: Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy

User Review  - Deborah B - Goodreads

This heartfelt memoir reflects back on the authors youthful years in Cuba during the few years leading up to the takeover by Castro. He remembers a boyhood of his privileged family and the many antics ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

1 UNO
1
2 DOS
6
3 TRES
12
4 CUATRO
24
5 CINCO
35
6 SEIS
43
7 SIETE
49
8 OCHO
58
23 VEINTITRES
216
24 VEINTICUATRO
224
25 VEINTICINCO
240
26 VEINTISEIS
249
27 VEINTISIETE
260
28 VEINTIOCHO
268
29 VEINTINUEVE
285
30 TREINTA
298

9 NUEVE
69
10 DIEZ
82
11 ONCE
89
12 DOCE
99
13 TRECE
109
14 CATORCE
119
15 QUINCE
132
16 DIECISEIS
148
17 DIECISIETE
152
18 DIECIOCHO
162
19 DIECINUEVE
168
20 VEINTE
182
21 VEINTIUNO
193
22 VEINTIDOS
206
31 TREINTA Y UNO
311
32 TREINTA Y DOS
316
33 TREINTA Y TRES
323
34 TREINTA Y CUATRO
328
35 TREINTA Y CINCO
335
36 TREINTA Y SEIS
338
37 TREINTA Y SIETE
351
38 TREINTA Y OCHO
359
39 TREINTA Y NUEVE
367
40 CUARENTA
374
Acknowledgments
385
About the Author
388
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Carlos Eire was born in Havana in 1950 and left his homeland in 1962, one of fourteen thousand unaccompanied children airlifted out of Cuba by Operation Pedro Pan. After living in a series of foster homes, he was reunited with his mother in Chicago in 1965. Eire earned his PhD at Yale University in 1979 and is now the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale. He lives in Guilford, Connecticut, with his wife, Jane, and their three children. 

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