They Marched Into Sunlight: War and Peace Vietnam and America October 1967

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Simon and Schuster, Oct 14, 2003 - History - 592 pages
5 Reviews
Here is the epic story of Vietnam and the sixties told through the events of a few gripping, passionate days of war and peace in October 1967. They Marched Into Sunlight brings that tumultuous time back to life while exploring questions about the meaning of dissent and the official manipulation of truth, issues as relevant today as they were decades ago.

In a seamless narrative, Maraniss weaves together the stories of three very different worlds: the death and heroism of soldiers in Vietnam, the anger and anxiety of antiwar students back home, and the confusion and obfuscating behavior of officials in Washington. To understand what happens to the people in these interconnected stories is to understand America's anguish. Based on thousands of primary documents and 180 on-the-record interviews, the book describes the battles that evoked cultural and political conflicts that still reverberate.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmele - LibraryThing

I did not want to read this book, chosen by my book club, but I am very glad I did. Maraniss shines a steady light on the Vietnam war and its consequences (for Americans, mostly). He drew me into the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lindap69 - LibraryThing

Getting to know the members of the Black Lion army battalion makes the battle scene in which 61 of them died even more harrowing making the statement of one member ("The whole damn war is run by the ... Read full review

Contents

Book One
1
Book Two
67
Book Three
139
Epilogue
505
Notes
529
Selected Bibliography
555
Acknowledgments
558
Index
561
About the Author
573
Photos
574
Copyright

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Page 5 - Some say that we shall never know and that to the gods we are like the flies that the boys kill on a summer day, and some say, on the contrary, that the very sparrows do not lose a feather that has not been brushed away by the finger of God.

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About the author (2003)

Born in Detroit, David Maraniss is an associate editor at The Washington Post. Maraniss is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author of Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story; First in His Class: A Biography of Bill Clinton; Rome 1960: The Olympics that Stirred the World; Barack Obama: The Story; Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero; They Marched into Sunlight: War and Peace, Vietnam and America, October 1967; and When Pride Still Mattered: A Life of Vince Lombardi, which was hailed by Sports Illustrated as “maybe the best sports biography ever published.” He lives in Washington, DC, and Madison, Wisconsin.

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