Native American Postcolonial Psychology

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SUNY Press, Mar 30, 1995 - Psychology - 246 pages
4 Reviews
This book shows that it is necessary to understand intergenerational trauma and internalized oppression in order to understand Native Americans today. It makes native American ways of conceptualizing the world available to readers.

This book presents a theoretical discussion of problems and issues encountered in the Native American community from a perspective that accepts Native knowledge as legitimate. Native American cosmology and metaphor are used extensively in order to deal with specific problems such as alcoholism, suicide, family, and community problems. The authors discuss what it means to present material from the perspective of a people who have legitimate ways of knowing and conceptualizing reality and show that it is imperative to understand intergenerational trauma and internalized oppression in order to understand the issues facing Native Americans today.
 

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This book talks about therapies used to help NA

Review: Native Amer Postcolonial Psycholog

User Review  - Denise Alvarado - Goodreads

For anyone interested in learning about Native American psychology and the role of historical trauma on the Native American psyche, then read this book. Duran introduces the idea of the Spirit of ... Read full review

Contents

Theory
1
Introduction
3
Psychological Worldviews
13
The Vehicle
23
Theoretical Concerns
55
Clinical Praxis
85
The Spirit of Alcohol
93
Intervention with Families
157
The Problem of Suicide
175
Community Intervention
185
Epilogue
201
Bibliography
209
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Eduardo Duran is Director of the Family and Child Guidance Clinic and Bonnie Duran is Director of the Healthy Nations Project at the Urban Indian Health Clinic in Oakland, CA. 

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