Harmony: A Course of Study

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B.F. Wood Music Company, 1922 - Harmony - 260 pages
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Page iii - to give the. student a working vocabulary of chords for the harmonizing of melodies, in the order of their practical value and harmonic importance. The author has endeavored to encourage the student to use his ever-Increasing chord material — not so much by warnings against what is bad as by examples of what Is good, as musicians understand it, and by maxims deduced from such examples. This book is not intended to deprive the teacher of his occupation, but rather to furnish him with useful text...
Page 259 - If, as has been repeatedly stated, the rules forbidding consecutive fifths, octaves, and augmented seconds and false relations, are broken with impunity or even ignored altogether by modern composers, the question arises, why were these rules ever promulgated? To this we may answer, if the effect justifies the means, any rule may be disregarded. This usually involves considerations other than purely harmonic ones; orchestral color, rhythm, and the dramatic effect often give striking significance...
Page 236 - I. No progression is right if it can be altered for the better. "II. No progression is wrong if it cannot be altered for the better. "III. Any progression of not more than one degree which does not involve consecutive fifths, consecutive octaves, augmented seconds, or false relations, is not wrong. "IV. Between a strong progression and a strong chord, choose the strong progression.
Page xiv - By inversion, major intervals become minor; minor intervals become major; augmented intervals become diminished; diminished intervals become augmented; perfect intervals remain perfect (hence the use of the word "perfect
Page iii - ... vocabulary of chords for the harmonizing of melodies, in the order of their practical value and harmonic importance. The author has endeavored to encourage the student to use his ever-increasing chord material— not so much by warnings against what is bad as by examples of what is good, as musicians understand it, and by maxims deduced from such examples. This book is not intended to deprive the teacher of his occupation, but rather to furnish him with useful text and material, systematically...
Page iii - ... is not intended to deprive the teacher of his occupation, but rather to furnish him with useful text and material, systematically arranged, which he Is to illustrate and elucidate as much as is necessary. To this end copious references and elaborate explanations of details have been avoided as much as is consistent with lucid statement. The student Is supposed to have already a rudimentary knowledge of the intervals, scales and chords given in the introduction. At first sight It would seem that...
Page 66 - Ex. 317. In the minor key, in order to avoid the interval of the augmented second between the sixth and seventh degrees of the scale, it is customary to use for passing notes the two melodic forms of the scale given in Exs. 132, 134, instead of the harmonic form given in Ex. 138. Therefore in passing from the dominant to the leading note of the minor key, or in the reverse direction from leading note to dominant, the...
Page 69 - If the fifth is present in the chord, and lies below the ninth, it must ascend to the third of the tonic, to avoid the consecutive fifths which would result from parallel motion with the ninth.
Page 61 - They form in themselves alone a fundamental system of diatonic harmony which, if thoroughly mastered, will be of the greatest assistance in all future studies.
Page xv - ... augmented, if there are four whole tones from one to five. A chord is inverted when its root is not at the bass ; chords with more than three letters are dissonant chords, called chords of the seventh if they contain four letters, chords of ninth if they contain five letters, etc., etc. Chords bear the name of the degree of the scale upon which they are written: First, tonic; second, supertonic; third, mediant; fourth, subdominant ; fifth, dominant; sixth, submediant; seventh, leading note or...

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