Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark 25th Anniversary Edition: Collected from American Folklore

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jul 9, 1986 - Juvenile Fiction - 111 pages
22 Reviews

This spooky addition to Alvin Schwartz's popular books on American folklore is filled with tales of eerie horror and dark revenge that will make you jump with fright.

There is a story here for everyone -- skeletons with torn and tangled flesh who roam the earth; a ghost who takes revenge on her murderer; and a haunted house where every night a bloody head falls down the chimney.

Stephen Gammell's splendidly creepy drawings perfectly capture the mood of more than two dozen scary stories -- and even scary songs -- all just right for reading alone or for telling aloud in the dark.

If You Dare!

 

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this book is really cool put the hole thing on and then it will be even better

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I love this book it is scary and unforgetable

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Contents

III
7
IV
11
V
12
VI
14
VII
17
VIII
18
IX
21
X
23
XXII
54
XXIII
56
XXIV
59
XXV
61
XXVI
65
XXVII
66
XXVIII
69
XXIX
73

XI
25
XII
27
XIII
29
XIV
33
XV
37
XVI
39
XVII
41
XVIII
43
XIX
45
XX
47
XXI
49
XXX
75
XXXI
76
XXXII
78
XXXIII
81
XXXIV
84
XXXV
86
XXXVI
91
XXXVII
99
XXXVIII
105
XXXIX
111
Copyright

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Page 39 - ... feet. They put you in a big black box And cover you up with dirt and rocks. All goes well for about a week, Then your coffin begins to leak. The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out, The worms play pinochle on your snout. They eat your eyes, they eat your nose, They eat the jelly between your toes. A big green worm with rolling eyes Crawls in your stomach and out your eyes. Your stomach turns a slimy green, And pus pours out like whipping cream. You spread it on a slice of bread, And that's what...
Page 31 - ... he'd be able to see it through. So he turned his chair to where he could watch, and he sat down and waited. It wasn't long before he heard the haunt start up again, slowly — step! — step! — step! — step! — closer, and closer — step! — step! — and it was right at the door. The preacher stood up and held his Bible out before him. Then the knob slowly turned, and the door opened wide. This time the preacher spoke quiet-like. He said, "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy...
Page 39 - Did you ever think when a hearse goes by that you might be the next to die? They wrap you up in a big white sheet and bury you about six feet deep.
Page 94 - ... Greasybeard. pp. 72-74, 187; Roberts, South, pp. 35-38, 217-18. "The Hearse Song" (p. 39): Although many adults are familiar with this song, it is best known in the elementary schools. But during World War I, it was a war song that was sung by servicemen from America and England. One version went this way: "Did you ever think as the hearse rolls by That some of these days you must surely die? They'll take you away in a big black hack; They'll take you away but they won't bring you back.
Page 25 - A farmer had a daughter for whom he cared more than anything on earth. She fell in love with a farmhand named Jim, but the farmer did not think Jim was good enough for his daughter. To keep them apart, he sent her to live with her uncle on the other side of the county. ' ' Soon after she left, Jim got sick, and he wasted away and died. Everyone said he died of a broken heart. The farmer felt so guilty about Jim's death, he could not tell his daughter what had happened. She continued to think about...
Page 18 - And when she came to the church-house stile She thought she'd stop and rest awhile. Oo oo oo! When she came up to the door She thought she'd stop and rest some more. Oo oo oo! But when she turned and looked around She saw a corpse upon the ground. Oo oo oo! From its nose down to its chin The worms crawled out, and the worms crawled in. Oo oo oo! The woman to the preacher said, "Shall I look like that when I am dead?
Page iv - Books'5 • (for younger readers) All of Our Noses Are Here and Other Noodle Tales Buzy Buzzing Bumblebees and Other Tongue Twisters Ghosts! Ghostly Tales from Folklore I Saw You in the Bathtub and Other Folk Rhymes In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories Ten Copycats in a Boat and Other Riddles There Is a Carrot in My Ear and Other Noodle Tales ^Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Collected from American Folklore by Alvin Schwartz with drawings by Stephen Gammell...
Page 40 - Don't you ever laugh as the hearse goes by, For you may be the next to die. They wrap you up in a big white sheet From your head down to your feet. They put you in a big black box And cover you up with dirt and rocks.

About the author (1986)

Alvin Schwartz is known for his more than two dozen books of folklore for young readers that explore everything from wordplay and humor to tales and legends of all kinds. Don't miss his other Scary Stories collections, including More Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark and Scary Stories 3.

Stephen Gammell is the winner of the Caldecott Medal for his drawings in Song and Dance Man by Karen Ackerman. His art in Where the Buffaloes Begin by Olaf Baker earned him a Caldecott Honor award, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and a New York Times Best Illustrated Books award. Other books he has illustrated include Will's Mammoth by Rafe Martin, andDancing Teepees: Poems of American Indian Youth by Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve.

Bibliographic information