Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader: North Korea and the Kim Dynasty

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Macmillan, Apr 1, 2007 - History - 880 pages
7 Reviews

Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader offers in-depth portraits of North Korea's two ruthless and bizarrely Orwellian leaders, Kim Il-Sung and Kim Jong-Il. Lifting North Korea's curtain of self-imposed isolation, this book will take readers inside a society, that to a Westerner, will appear to be from another planet. Subsisting on a diet short on food grains and long on lies, North Koreans have been indoctrinated from birth to follow unquestioningly a father-son team of megalomaniacs.

To North Koreans, the Kims are more than just leaders. Kim Il-Sung is the country's leading novelist, philosopher, historian, educator, designer, literary critic, architect, general, farmer, and ping-pong trainer. Radios are made so they can only be tuned to the official state frequency. "Newspapers" are filled with endless columns of Kim speeches and propaganda. And instead of Christmas, North Koreans celebrate Kim's birthday--and he presents each child a present, just like Santa.

The regime that the Kim Dynasty has built remains technically at war with the United States nearly a half century after the armistice that halted actual fighting in the Korean War. This fascinating and complete history takes full advantage of a great deal of source material that has only recently become available (some from archives in Moscow and Beijing), and brings the reader up to the tensions of the current day. For as this book will explain, North Korea appears more and more to be the greatest threat among the Axis of Evil countries--with some defector testimony warning that Kim Jong-Il has enough chemical weapons to wipe out the entire population of South Korea.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cyafer - LibraryThing

An interesting and enlightening book whose true effect was heavily clouded by a confusing lack of organization. The author bounces rapidly between history, personal interpretations of events ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rameau - LibraryThing

A few months ago, I reread 1984 and wondered whether such a society could survive. The answer is yes. Kim Il-Sung and Kim Jong-Il have done it. The personality cult is indeed a cult. It's like the ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
TWO Fighters and Psalmists
THREE On Long Marches Through Blizzards
FOUR Heaven and Earth the Wise Leader Tamed
FIVE IronWilled Brilliant Commander
SIX With the Leader Who Unfolded Paradise
SEVEN When He Hugged Us Still Damp from the
EIGHT Flowers of His Great Love Are Blooming
TWENTY Wherever You Go in My Homeland
TWENTYONE If Your Brain Is Properly Oiled
TWENTYTWO Logging In and Logging
TWENTYTHREE Do You Remember That Time?
TWENTYFOUR Pickled Plum in a Lunch
TWENTYFIVE I Die You
TWENTYSIX Yen for the Motherland
TWENTYEIGHT Sea of Fire

NINE He Gave Us Water and Sent Us Machines
TEN Lets Spread the Pollen of Love
ELEVEN Yura
TWELVE Growing Pains
THIRTEEN Take the Lead in World Conjuring
FOURTEEN Eyes and Ears
SIXTEEN Our Earthly Paradise Free from
SEVENTEEN Two Women
EIGHTEEN Dazzling Ray of Guidance
NINETEEN A Story to Tell to the Nations
TWENTYNINE Without You There Is No Country
THIRTY We Will Become Bullets and Bombs
THIRTYONE Neither Land nor People at Peace
THIRTYTHREE Even the Traitors Who Live
THIRTYFOUR Though Alive Worse Than Gutter
THIRTYFIVE Sun of the TwentyFirst Century
THIRTYSIX Fear and Loathing
THIRTYSEVEN Sing of Our Leaders Favors
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INDEX

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About the author (2007)

As a journalist, Bradley K. Martin has covered Korea and other parts of Asia for a quarter century, including stints as bureau chief for The Baltimore Sun, The Asian Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Asia Times (for which he wrote a "Pyongyang Watch" column), and Asian Financial Intelligence. Since 1979, he has had four prolonged stays in North Korea and more direct access to the country than most any other American journalist. He is currently a journalist in residence at Louisiana State University.

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