Diseases of the Bladder and Urethra in Women

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Page 193 - The milk may be taken cold or tepid and not more than a pint at a time, lest a large mass of curd, difficult of digestion, form and collect in the stomach. Some adults will take as much as a gallon in the twenty-four hours. With some persons the milk is found to agree better after it has been boiled, and then taken either cold or tepid. If the milk be rich in cream, and if the cream disagree, causing heartburn, headache, diarrhoea, or the symptoms of dyspepsia, the cream may be partially removed...
Page 273 - In*old cases which began by a severe acute attack, 'and where the walls of the urethra are very much thickened and the canal contracted, dilatation with bougies does much good. While the bougie is passed once or twice a week, I apply to the vaginal portion of the urethra oleate of mercury or the unguentum hydrargyri. This will often suffice to stop the gleety discharge, as well as remove the thickening of the urethral walls.
Page 206 - The main difficulty hitherto has been to keep the incision open after the use of the scissors or knife. Artificial means must be resorted to, such as an india-rubber tube passed from the urethra through the opening, which is annoying and painful, or a glass button introduced, which is difficult to retain, and when retained is apt to beget vesical tenesmus. I believe the use of the actual cautery at a red heat will be found to answer all purposes.
Page 310 - There is an apparent increase of tissue in the walls of the urethra during utero-gestation, and the dilatability of the canal is often increased also. Now, this condition of the parts disappears during the involution which takes place after delivery ; but when from any cause the process of involution is interrupted, the enlarged vessels and relaxed condition of the urethral walls remain and sometimes increase. When to this state of the parts a catarrh of the mucous membrane is added, the enlargement...
Page 336 - ... time to see if there is any tendency for the stricture to return. Stricture at the Junction of the Urethra and Bladder. — I desire to direct special attention to this form of stricture because it is, so far as I know, peculiar to women, and its influence on the function of the bladder has not been pointed out. In fact, no distinction has been made between the pathology or clinical history of stricture at the upper end of the urethra and elsewhere in the canal. At least, I am not aware that...
Page 183 - The skin of patients with chronic cystitis is usually sallow, loose, and has a lifeless feeL Indeed, one might almost make a diagnosis from the complexion alone. Sweating of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet is common. In low states of the system the patients are especially liable to nightsweats.
Page 283 - ... be erectile, the anatomical peculiarities of which structure are already familiar. Virchow believes these tumors to be a combination of urethral haemorrhoids and remnants of embryonal duplicity of the vagina, Areolar Neoplasms. — These new growths are either fibromata or sarcomata. The fibromata may lie within the canal of the urethra or be imbedded in its walls. When in the urethra or protruding from the meatus, they are pedunculated, and have been known as urethral polypi. They vary in size...
Page 266 - ... subacute urethritis ; but, upon the most careful examination that can be made, with all the means at one's command, there will be failure to find any lesions to account for the symptoms present. To this condition the name neuralgia has been applied, rather improperly, no doubt. From my own observation of this affection, in which there are well-marked symptoms, with no apparent anatomical lesions, I have been led to the conclusion that it is a disease of the nerves of the part — one of the neuroses,...
Page 191 - CYSTITIS requires both local and constitutional treatment, and withal it is a troublesome disease to manage, especially in its chronic form. The constitutional treatment consists, first of all, in so regulating the character of the urine that it shall be unirritating to the diseased organ. Pain and vesical tenesmus should be relieved if possible. The skin should be kept in a healthy and active condition, and the bowels regular and free, in order to prevent all straining at stool, and secure free...

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