The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-events in America

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Vintage Books, 1992 - History - 319 pages
68 Reviews

First published in 1962, this wonderfully provocative book introduced the notion of "pseudo-events"--events such as press conferences and presidential debates, which are manufactured solely in order to be reported--and the contemporary definition of celebrity as "a person who is known for his well-knownness." Since then Daniel J. Boorstin's prophetic vision of an America inundated by its own illusions has become an essential resource for any reader who wants to distinguish the manifold deceptions of our culture from its few enduring truths.

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Review: The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America

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Although written 50 years ago, this is still a tremendously incisive and readable look at the cultural bubble America was constructing as a substitute for reality. Boorstin, one of the great American ... Read full review

Review: The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America

User Review  - Goodreads

Today in entertainment Nicki Minaj tweeted that Taylor Swift parked in a handicapped spot and laughed while a 87 year old woman had to push her walker 3 blocks to her chemotherapy appointment. Swift ... Read full review


Extravagant Expectations
From News Gathering to News Making A Flood of PseudoEvents
From Hero to Celebrity The Human PseudoEvent

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About the author (1992)

A prolific writer, Daniel Boorstin is the author of numerous scholarly and popular works in American Studies. Born in Georgia and raised in Oklahoma, Boorstin received degrees from Harvard and Yale universities and was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. A member of the Massachusetts Bar, he has been visiting professor of American History at the Universities of Rome, Puerto Rico, Kyoto, and Geneva. He was the first incumbent of the chair of American History at the Sorbonne and Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at Cambridge. He taught at the University of Chicago for 25 years. In 1959 Columbia University awarded him its Bancroft Prize for The Americans: The Colonial Experience (1958), the first volume of his trilogy titled The Americans. In 1966 he received the Francis Parkman Award for the second volume, The Americans: The National Experience (1965), and in 1974 he received the Pulitzer Prize for the third volume, The Americans: The Democratic Experience (1973). Many of Boorstin's books have been translated into Chinese, Japanese, and various European languages. In 1969 Boorstin became director of the National Museum of History and Technology of the Smithsonian Institution. In 1973 he became senior historian at the Smithsonian. Boorstin was appointed Librarian of Congress in 1975 and served in that position with distinction for 12 years, becoming Librarian Emeritus in 1987.

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