All in the Day's Work: An Autobiography

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University of Illinois Press, 1939 - Biography & Autobiography - 412 pages
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"Tarbell was the only woman in her class of forty students at Allegheny College. Shortly after graduation she took a job at The Chautauquan, beginning a lifelong immersion in the world of journalism. But it was at McClure's magazine - where she was the only woman on staff - that Tarbell made her name as a determined journalist, one of the fearless brigade of truth seekers famously chastised by Theodore Roosevelt, who used the term "muckraker" to discredit those who attacked U.S. senators in print. Tarbell also wrote serialized biographies of Napoleon and Abraham Lincoln, as well as a landmark series of articles on Standard Oil and John D. Rockefeller."
  

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Contents

II
1
III
19
IV
37
V
49
VI
64
VII
89
VIII
124
IX
147
XIII
231
XIV
254
XV
280
XVI
301
XVII
319
XVIII
336
XIX
359
XX
385

X
161
XI
179
XII
202
XXI
398
XXII
409
Copyright

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About the author (1939)

Ida M. Tarbell is remembered for her muckraking journalism and her expose of the Standard Oil Company. Kenneth J. Winkle is an associate professor of history at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and author of "The Politics of Community: Migration and Politics in Antebellum Ohio.

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