Penrod

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Doubleday, Page, 1915 - Boys - 345 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
12
III
21
IV
30
V
38
VI
47
VII
51
VIII
58
XVII
167
XVIII
177
XIX
192
XX
203
XXI
212
XXII
225
XXIII
241
XXIV
249

IX
64
X
71
XI
84
XII
93
XIII
107
XIV
118
XV
131
XVI
149
XXV
262
XXVI
283
XXVII
299
XXVIII
308
XXIX
318
XXX
326
XXXI
341
Copyright

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Page 254 - Now what," asked the barber, combing the reeking locks gently, "what would it make you so mad fer, to have somebody call you a little gentleman ? It's a kind of compliment, as it were, you might say. What would you want to hit anybody fer that fer?" To the mind of Penrod, this question was without meaning or reasonableness. It was within neither his power nor his desire to analyze the process by which the phrase had become offensive to him, and was now rapidly assuming the proportions of an outrage....
Page 279 - Idylls of the King' — poetry of the sound Victorian days; there is none later. Or Longfellow will rest me in a tired hour. Yes; for me, a book, a volume in the hand, held lightly between the fingers." Mr. Kinosling looked pleasantly at his fingers as he spoke, waving his hand in a curving gesture which brought it into the light of a window faintly illumined from the interior of the house. Then he passed those graceful fingers over his hair, and turned toward Penrod, who was perched upon the railing...
Page 280 - Very good, little gentleman!" said Mr. Kinosling, and being somewhat chilled, placed the hat firmly upon his head, pulling it down as far as it would go. It had a pleasant warmth, which he noticed at once. The next instant, he noticed something else, a peculiar sensation of the scalp— a sensation which he was quite unable to define. He lifted his hand to take the hat off, and entered upon a strange experience: his hat seemed to have decided to remain where it was. "Do you like Tennyson as much...
Page 249 - Penrod was zigzagging back to normal. CHAPTER XXIV "LITTLE GENTLEMAN" THE midsummer sun was stinging hot outside the little barber-shop next to the corner drug store and Penrod, undergoing a toilette preliminary to his very slowly approaching twelfth birthday, was adhesive enough to retain upon his face much hair as it fell from the shears. There is a mystery here: the tonsorial processes are not unagreeable to manhood; in truth, they are soothing; but the hairs detached from a boy's head get into...
Page 5 - Darkness closed in. Penrod had rather vaguely debated plans for a selfmutilation such as would make his appearance as the Child Sir Lancelot inexpedient on public grounds; it was a heroic and attractive thought, but the results of some extremely sketchy preliminary experiments caused him to abandon it. There was no escape; and at last his hour was hard upon him. Therefore he brooded on the fence and gazed with envy at his wistful Duke. The dog's name was undescriptive of his person, which was obviously...
Page 261 - ... heaved it into the air. Marjorie screamed. But it was too late. The big stone descended into the precise midst of the caldron and Penrod got his mighty splash. It was far, far beyond his expectations. Spontaneously there were grand and awful effects — volcanic spectacles of nightmare and eruption. A black...
Page 251 - There was a touch of intentional contempt in this. "I haven't heard nobody around the neighbourhood makin' no such remarks," added the barber, "about nobody of the name of Penrod Schofield." "Well," said Penrod, clearing his mouth after a struggle, "who wants 'em to? Ouch!" "I hear they call Georgie Bassett the 'little gentleman,' " ventured the barber, provocatively, meeting with instant success. "They better not call me that," returned Penrod truculently. "I'd like to hear anybody try. Just once,...
Page 263 - Little GEN-TIL-MUN!" shrieked Marjorie, with a wild stroke that landed full upon Penrod's tarry cap. "Ooochl" bleated Penrod. "It's Penrod!" shouted Sam Williams, recognizing him by the voice. For an instant he had been in some doubt. "Penrod Schofield!" exclaimed Georgie Bassett. "What does this mean?
Page 280 - If you will be so good," said Mr. Kinosling. "It is a black bowler hat, little gentleman, and placed upon a table in the hall." "I know where it is." Penrod entered the door, and a feeling of relief, mutually experienced, carried from one to another of his three relatives their interchanged congratulations that he had recovered his sanity. " 'The day is done, and the darkness,' " began Mr. Kinosling— and recited that poem entire. He followed it with "The Children's Hour...
Page 277 - Yes, I think I may claim to understand boys," he said, smiling thoughtfully. "One has been a boy one's self. Ah, it is not all playtime! I hope our young scholar here does not overwork himself at his Latin, at his classics, as I did, so that at the age of eight years I was compelled to wear glasses. He must be careful not to strain the little eyes at his scholar's tasks, not to let the little shoulders grow round over his scholar's desk. Youth is golden; we should keep it golden, bright, glistening....

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