Transcontinental Railway Strategy, 1869-1893: A Study of Businessmen

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Beard Books, Oct 1, 2000 - Business & Economics - 468 pages
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Contents

Introduction
1
Fight for Position
15
Reverses and Failures
40
Scott vs Huntington
56
Gould vs PerkinsThe Battle at the Omaha Gateway
70
Gould Nicker son and VillardThe Fight for the Eastern Colorado Gateways
88
Competition and Monopoly
104
Expansion 18791883Northwest
122
The Fight for TrafficTranscontinental
258
Expansion Program Renewed 18861887 Central West
270
Expansion Program Renewed 18861887 Northwest and Southwest
289
Ruinous Competition
312
Stabilization by Industrywide Action Interstate Commerce Railway Association
338
Stabilization by Industrywide Action Western Traffic Association
354
Stabilization by Corporate Action
365
Final 1gth Century Transcontinental Building Program
388

Expansion 18791883Central
148
Expansion 18791883Southwest
162
Financing the Expansion 18791883
178
The Boom Bursts
202
The Fight for Traffic
226
Profit and Loss
401
Conclusion
421
Index
431
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Page 5 - The topography of the county varies from gently rolling to rough and hilly adjacent to the larger streams. The bluffs along the Missouri river rise to a height of 150 to 350 feet. The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, the Chicago Rock Island and Pacific and the Chicago Great Western railroads afford good transportation facilities, while the extensive river frontage gives an excellent opportunity for transportation to Kansas City or St. Joseph by water. The Missourian underlies the entire county, having...
Page 4 - I have about made up my mind that it is about as well to fight them on all the railroads in the state as on our road, as it is not much more fight and there is more pay...
Page 10 - The railroads also competed for funds with rapidly growing cities in need of municipal improvements. Other demands upon the limited capital supply came from industries: coal, iron, steel, lumber, farm equipment, copper, and an increasing variety of manufacturing and fabricating enterprises. High interest rates reflected both strong demands and high risks. Relatively little institutional money — money raised from the savings of the masses — was available forwestern railroad investment.

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