And the Risen Bread: Selected Poems, 1957-1997

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Fordham Univ Press, 1998 - Poetry - 417 pages
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And the Risen Bread is a culmination of forty years of poetry by the late American Jesuit and activist Daniel Berrigan. Beginning with poems written on bucolic themes, the book moves to those dealing with the struggle against war. Included are poems written from courtrooms and jail cells, as well as religious poems which include the doubt and difficulty that arise from the many horrors of our world today.
 

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And the risen bread: selected poems, 1957-1997

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Because of politics, or perhaps religion, Berrigan has never received his due as a poet. Jesuit and activist, he's been writing poems from rectories, safe houses, and jail cells for more than 40 years ... Read full review

And the risen bread: selected poems, 1957-1997

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Because of politics, or perhaps religion, Berrigan has never received his due as a poet. Jesuit and activist, he's been writing poems from rectories, safe houses, and jail cells for more than 40 years ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
xix
Time Without Numb
1
E ncounters
19
Tke World for Wedding Ring
37
No One Walks Waters
55
Love Love at the End
83
False Gods Real Men
89
Night Flight to Hanoi
111
The Discipline of the Mountain
191
May All Creatures Live
203
Block Island
245
Hymn to the New Humanity
259
The Mission
265
Stations
279
In Memoriam
291
Homage to Gerard Manley Hopkins
313

Trial Poems
119
Cornell Poems
127
Tke Dark Night or Resistance
135
America Is Hard to Find
141
Prison Poems
147
Uncommon Prayer
177
Jubilee
329
Isaiah
347
Plowshares Poems
357
Diary or Sorts
373
Beyond
395
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Page 30 - MORE LIKE THE SEA A man is more than two sticks crossed: he is more like the sea, bringing up God knows what at any moment. CONRAD Nail him to sticks he stands free and makes sense even of agony, even of sticks and stones. No grafting him on: his fruits are free, and other: eyes rounding worlds, more men loved, more years
Page xxiii - LIGHTNING STRUCK HERE If stones can dream, after some hundred years shouldering weight, making a wall inch onward heaving it up a hill, braking its roll, being only half above ground, taking the crack of frost, the infernal sun, the insinuating, sleepy moss: — if stones can still...
Page v - They were taken for fools They were taken for being taken in. Some walked and walked and walked. They walked the earth They walked the waters They walked the air. Why do you stand? they were asked, and Why do you walk? Because of the children, they said, and Because of the heart, and Because of the bread Because the cause is the heart's beat and the children born and the risen bread.
Page 11 - ... long to stand up naked, a new creation with horizon to see what they do, where the wall goes what shires, forests, it holds — I suppose the dream might rise, might arc, take color and stance of these birches that fan out suddenly, bursting the wall with powerful feet...
Page 26 - Lazarus Sister, you placed my heart in its stone room where no flowers curiously come, and sun's voice rebuffed, hangs on the stones dumb. What I could not bear I still must hear. Why do your tears fall? why does their falling move Him, the friend, the unsuspected lightning: that He walk our garden with no flowers upon His friend, but a voice splitting my stone to a dream gone, my sleep to day ? what, what do tears say to Him ? what did He say in tears, that His grief fall scalding my hands, that...

About the author (1998)

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Daniel Berrigan is author of fourteen volumes of poetry. His first volume of poetry, Time Without Number (1957), whose publication occurred at the suggestion of poet Marianne Moore, was nominated for the National Book Award and awarded the prestigious Lamant Prize for Poetry by the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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