A Short History of Puritanism

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T. & T. Clark, 1908 - Puritans - 236 pages
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Page 151 - Enow of such as for their bellies' sake, Creep and intrude, and climb into the fold? Of other care they little reckoning make, Than how to scramble at the shearers' feast, And shove away the worthy bidden guest; Blind mouths!
Page 151 - And when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw...
Page 45 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Page 203 - ... a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 174 - If God reveal anything to you by any other instrument of his, be as ready to receive it as ever you were to receive any truth by my ministry: for I am verily persuaded, the Lord has more truth yet to break forth out of his holy word.
Page 183 - This place is holy ; the ground is holy ; in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, I pronounce it holy.
Page 174 - I beseech you, remember it is an article of your church covenant, " That you be ready to receive whatever truth shall be made known to you from the written word of God.
Page 28 - I defer to speak at this time and understood at the last not only that there was no room in my lord of London's palace to translate the new testament, but also that there was no place to do it in all England, as experience doth now openly declare.
Page 98 - For ye may all prophesy one by one, that all may learn, and all may be comforted.
Page 152 - We live in better times ; and we are not afraid to say, that, though there were many clever men in England during the latter half of the seventeenth century, there were only two minds which possessed the imaginative faculty in a very eminent degree. One of those minds produced the Paradise Lost, the other the Pilgrim's Progress.

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