Manners, Culture and Dress of the Best American Society,: Including Social, Commercial and Legal Forms, Letter Writing, Invitations, &c., Also Valuable Suggestions on Self Culture and Home Training

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King, Richardson, 1890 - Etiquette - 502 pages
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Page 25 - WHO can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies. The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil. She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life. She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands. She is like the merchants' ships; she bringeth her food from afar.
Page 30 - Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; ie, waste nothing. 6. INDUSTRY Lose no time; be always employed in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. 7. SINCERITY Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly. 8. JUSTICE Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.
Page 215 - I have observed that a married man, falling into misfortune, is more apt to retrieve his situation in the world than a single one; partly because he is more stimulated to exertion by the necessities of...
Page 291 - Let your conversation be without malice or envy, for it is a sign of a tractable and commendable nature; and in all causes of passion, admit reason to govern.
Page 30 - Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. 3 ORDER Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. 4 RESOLUTION Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. 5 FRUGALITY Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; ie, waste nothing.
Page 289 - In the presence of others sing not to yourself with a humming noise, nor drum with your fingers or feet.
Page 289 - Read no letters, books, or papers in company ; but when there is a necessity for doing it, you must ask leave. Come not near the books or writings of any one so as to read them, unless desired, nor give your opinion of them unasked ; also, look not nigh when another is writing a letter.
Page 291 - Speak not of doleful things in time of mirth, nor at the table ; speak not of melancholy things, as death and wounds, and if others mention them, change, if you can, the discourse.
Page 194 - Principals are responsible for the acts of their agents. Each individual in a partnership is responsible for the whole amount of the debts of the firm, except in cases of special partnership.
Page 26 - She openeth her mouth with wisdom, and in her tongue is the law of kindness. She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. Her children arise up and call her blessed, her husband also, and he praiseth her.

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