Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature

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Bloomsbury Publishing, Jul 27, 2017 - Philosophy - 288 pages
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In 1988 the philosopher Gilles Deleuze remarked that, throughout his career, he had always been 'circling around' a concept of nature. Providing critical analysis of his highly original readings of Stoicism, Aristotle, and Epicurus, this book shows that it is Deleuze's interpretations of ancient Greek physics that provide the key to understanding his conception of nature.

Using the works of Aristotle, Plato, Chrysippus, and Epicurus, Michael Bennett traces the development of Deleuze's key concepts of event, difference, and problem. Arguing that it is difficult, if not impossible, to fully understand these ideas without an appreciation of Deleuze's Hellenistic influences, Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics situates his commentaries in the context of contemporary scholarship on ancient Greek philosophy. Delving into the original Greek and Latin texts, this book shows that Deleuze's readings are more complex and controversial than they first appear, simultaneously advancing Deleuze as a new voice in interpretations of ancient Greek philosophy.

Generating both new critical analyses of Deleuze and a new appreciation for his classical erudition, Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics will be a valuable resource for anyone interested in ancient Greek philosophy, Deleuze's philosophical project or his unique methodology in the history of philosophy.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
Difference and NonBeing
Sense and Truth
Surface and Paradox
Events and Fate
Analogy and Difference
Nature and Individuation
Atoms and Minima
Problematic Ideas and the Swerve
Chaos and Thought
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Michael James Bennett is Lecturer in History of Science and Technology at the University of King's College, Canada.

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