Individual and Community: The Rise of the Polis, 800-500 B.C.

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Oxford University Press, 1986 - History - 133 pages
During the three centuries from 800 to 500 B.C., the Greek world evolved from a primitive society--both culturally and economically--to one whose artistic products dominated all Mediterranean markets, supported by a wide overseas trade. In the following two centuries came the literary, philosophical, and artistic masterpieces of the classic area. Vital to this advance was the development of the polis, a collective institution in which citizens had rights as well as duties under the rule of law, a system hitherto unknown in human history. In this study, the first systematic exploration of the forces that created the political framework of Greek civilization, Chester Starr shows how the Greeks emerged form a Homeric world of individuals to the polis of 500 B.C. The age-old conflict between the self-serving demands of human beings and the less vocally-expressed needs of the community serves as the backbone of Starr's interdisciplinary analysis of the rise of the polis.
 

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Contents

Land Sea and Sun
3
An Age of Chieftains
15
Crystallization of the Polis
34
Patriotism and Divisiveness
52
Upheaval and Reform
67
The Polis World in 500 BC
87
Notes
101
Bibliography
127
Index
131
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