Idoru

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 7, 2003 - Fiction - 400 pages
216 Reviews
2lst century Tokyo, after the millennial quake. Neon rain. Light everywhere blowing under any door you might try to close. Where the New Buildings, the largest in the world, erect themselves unaided, their slow rippling movements like the contractions of a sea-creature.Colin Laney is here looking for work. He is not, he is careful to point out, a voyeur. He is an intuitive fisher of patterns of information, the "signature" a particular individual creates simply by going about the business of living. But Laney knows how to sift for the interesting (read: dangerous) bits. Which makes him very useful--to certain people.Chia McKenzie is here on a rescue mission. She's fourteen. Her idol is the singer Rez, of the band Lo/Rez. When the Seattle chapter of the Lo/Rez fan club decided that he might be in trouble, in Tokyo, they sent Chia to check it out.Rei Toei is the beautiful, entirely virtual media star adored by all Japan. The idoru. And Rez has declared that he will marry her. This is the rumor that brought Chia to Tokyo. But the things that bother Rez are not the things that bother most people. Is something different here, in the very nature of reality? Or is it that something violently New is about to happen? It's possible the idoru is as real as she wants or needs to be--or as real as Rez desires. When Colin Laney looks into her dark eyes, trying hard to think of her as no more than a hologram, he sees things he's never seen before. He sees how she might break a man's heart.And, whatever else may be true, the idoru and the powerful interests surrounding her are enough to put all their lives in danger.
 

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Action, great writing, great characterizations, wow! - Goodreads
Would have been 4 stars except for the abrupt ending. - Goodreads
Gibson is a gifted writer. - Goodreads
Something about the understated ending left me flat. - Goodreads
The ending was a bit of a let-down however. - Goodreads
I loved it at first but the ending let me down. - Goodreads

Review: Idoru (Bridge #2)

User Review  - JW - Goodreads

This might have been the tipping point when William Gibson stopped caring if readers could follow his narrative. When the tactile-floweriness of his prose became more important than readability. It ... Read full review

Review: Idoru (Bridge #2)

User Review  - Quiet - Goodreads

This isn't the first Gibson novel I've read, but it's the first one I've actually finished. Idoru is in this weird spot. It takes the high-tec Japanese idealization of the genre to the max by being ... Read full review

All 25 reviews »

Contents

1Death Cube K
2Lo Rez Skyline
3Almost a Civilian
4Venice Decompressed
5Nodal Points
6DESH
7The Wet Warm Life in Alison Shires
8Narita
25The Idoru
26Hak Nam
27That Physical Thing
28A Matter of Credit
29Her Bad Side
30The Etruscan
31The Way Things Work
32The Uninvited

9Out of Control
10Whiskey Clone
11Collapse of New Buildings
12Mitsuko
13Character Recognition
14Tokyo Chapter
15Akihabara
16Zona
17The Walls of Fame
18The Otaku
19Arleigh
20Monkey Boxing
21Standover Man
22Gomi Boy
23Here at the Western World
24Hotel Di
33Topology
34Casino
35The Testbed of Futurity
36Maryalice
37Work Experience
38Star
39Trans
40The Business
41Candlelight and Tears
42Checking Out
43Toecutters Breakfast
44La Purissima
45Lucky
46Fables of the Reconstruction
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

William Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer, won the Hugo

William Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer, won the Hugo Award, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Nebula AwaAward, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Nebula Award in 1984. He is credited with having coined the term "cyberd in 1984. He is credited with having coined the term "cyberspace," and having envisioned both the Internet and virtualrspace," and having envisioned both the Internet and virtual reality before either existed. His other novels include All reality before either existed. His other novels include All Tomorrow's Parties, Idoru, Virtual Light, Mona Lisa Overdri Tomorrow's Parties, Idoru, Virtual Light, Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Count Zero. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia ve, and Count Zero. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia with his wife and two children. with his wife and two children.

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