The Scotch-Irish: A Social History

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Aug 1, 1989 - History - 377 pages
4 Reviews
Dispelling much of what he terms the "mythology" of the Scotch-Irish, James Leyburn provides an absorbing account of their heritage. He traces their life in Scotland, when the essentials of their character and culture were shaped; their removal to Norther
 

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Historically founded, quoting many original sources, and well organized, to capture the true heart of a Scotch-Irish family member. This is the quintessential read on why the Scots left to the "Ulster Plantations" of Northern Ireland, and why again and again they continued on the move in the colonies and future states of America, Australia, and other continents. James Leyburn, being a researcher in a major American Presbyterian University, had a good mind to the religious and warrior bent that these rough and ready settlers had. I found these parts of the book well documented, but it did not show the later religious dispositions as the westward progression unfolded. This book will quickly settle any questions about the Scotch-Irish having any royalty, they certainly had none and no longer desired to be around them after their long trials in the dark ages (which they immerged 200 years later than England), the Ulster experiment, the horrid crossings in near slave like conditions, their life as indentured servants in America. I have and will continue to use this book as a primer for my studies, as in it, you may find many details of American History. It is a far cry better than any easy read novella by James Webb "Born Fighting : How the Scots-Irish Shaped America" (which is filled with so much political crap and revisionism, to make it unworthy).
Note: Scotch-Irish is a self afflicted term to early American Settlers from Ulster-Ireland (not Irish, but distinctly Presbyterian Ulster-Scots). Scots-Irish is a more politically correct term as of late, to avoid slandering any Scot by associating him with his drink. I go by the former term, as a term of endearment.
Bobthefarmer
 

Contents

IV
3
V
14
VI
36
VII
47
VIII
56
IX
62
X
81
XI
83
XX
184
XXI
186
XXII
200
XXIII
210
XXIV
223
XXV
235
XXVI
256
XXVII
273

XII
99
XIII
101
XIV
108
XV
120
XVI
133
XVII
140
XVIII
155
XIX
157
XXVIII
296
XXIX
317
XXX
327
XXXI
335
XXXII
338
XXXIII
354
XXXIV
373
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About the author (1989)

The late James G. Leyburn was professor of sociology at Washington and Lee University.

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