Color Theory

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Watson-Guptill Publications, 1989 - Art - 111 pages
3 Reviews
In depth demonstrations teach how to interpret the basic shapes of the head and facial features.
Everyone who paints or draws portraits worries most about one thing: getting an accurate likeness. But getting a likeness doesn't take genius and isn't based on a bag of tricks. It's really a matter of learning to use a logical procedure, based on careful observation of the subject, and then lots of practice.
Drawing a Likeness is divided into three parts. In the first part you learn how to analyze a head--how to recognize the basic shapes and their variations, and place the features within the larger form of the head. Drawings of many different subjects serve as examples. In the second part, the actual drawing procedure is analyzed in minute detail as three different-shaped heads--oval, rectangular, and round--are drawn. Each of these three demonstrations contains a photograph of the subject and develops the portrait in great detail (45 actual steps) right down to the finished drawing. In the third part of the book, you learn how to use different combinations of drawing materials to create a wide range of effects: charcoal, Conté, and carbon pencils on both gray and white charcoal paper, graphite pencils on illustration board, soft and hard charcoal sticks and pencils on smooth board, charcoal and carbon pencil worked over acrylic-gessoed chipboard. There are six demonstrations in this section showing how to draw men and women of different ages. Each demonstration has ten steps, one per page, and includes a photograph of the subject.
Drawing a Likeness is a basic, practical book for anyone who has ever tried to draw or paint a portrait--students, amateurs, professionals, and teachers.

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Review: Color Theory

User Review  - Red Pixel - Goodreads

nice Read full review

Review: Color Theory

User Review  - Serge Pierro - Goodreads

An interesting book on color theory. It is broken down into sections that are well explained, and have examples relevant to the theory at hand. Read full review


Light and its colors
Complementary colors

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