The Mirror: A Periodical Paper, Pub. at Edinburgh in the Years 1779 and 1780, Volume 2

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W. Creech, Edinburgh, and W. Strahan, and T. Cadell, London, 1781 - Periodicals
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Page 138 - And he gave it for his opinion, " That whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 343 - ... into ten thousand pieces had her body been made of adamant. It is much easier for my reader to imagine my state of mind upon such an occasion than for me to express it. I said to myself, It is not in the power of heaven to relieve me! when I awaked, equally transported and astonished, to see myself drawn out of an affliction which, the very moment before, appeared to me altogether inextricable.
Page 48 - s hand) ; but when I look on this renovated being as the gift of the Almighty, I feel a far different sentiment; my heart dilates with gratitude and love to him ; it is prepared for doing his will, not as a duty, but as a pleasure; and regards every breach of it, not with disapprobation, but with horror." " You say right, my dear sir...
Page 65 - You behold the mourner of his only child, the last earthly stay and blessing of his declining years! Such a child too! - It becomes not me to speak of her virtues; yet it is but gratitude to mention them, because they were exerted towards myself. Not many days ago you saw her young, beautiful, virtuous, and happy; ye who are parents will judge of my felicity then, - ye will judge of my affliction now.
Page 43 - ... some distant country, and that the father had been suddenly seized in the night with a dangerous disorder, which the people of the inn where they lodged feared would prove mortal; that...
Page 51 - He found in them the guileless manner of the earliest times, with the culture and accomplishment of the most refined ones. Every better feeling warm and vivid ; every ungentle one repressed or overcome. He was not addicted to love ; but he felt himself happy in being the friend of Mademoiselle La...
Page 66 - The inspiration of the pulpit was past; at sight of him the scenes they had last met in, rushed again on his mind; La Roche threw his arms round his neck, and watered it with his tears. The other was equally affected; they went together, in silence, into the parlour, where the evening service was wont to be performed.
Page 52 - The honest folks were awkward but sincere in their professions of regard. They made some attempts at condolence ; it was too delicate for their handling, but La Roche took it in good part.
Page 61 - Not that he was ever a lover of the lady's; but he thought her one of the most amiable women he had seen, and there was something in the idea of her being another's for ever, that struck him, he knew not why, like a disappointment.
Page 59 - About three years after our philosopher was on a visit at Geneva: the promise he made to La Roche and his daughter, on his former visit, was recalled to his mind by the view of that range of mountains, on a part of which they had often looked together. There was a reproach, too, conveyed along with the recollection for his having failed to write to either for several months past.

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