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Books Books 1 - 10 of 43 on The gaping chinks admitted every blast; the leaning chimneys had lost half their....
" The gaping chinks admitted every blast; the leaning chimneys had lost half their original height ; the rotten rafters were evidently misplaced ; while in many instances the thatch, yawning in some parts to admit the wind and wet, and in all utterly unfit... "
Douglas Jerrold's shilling magazine - Page 561
1845
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Report to Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department ...

Great Britain. Poor Law Commissioners - Housing - 1842 - 457 pages
...rotten and displaced ; and the thatch, yawning to admit the wind and wet in some parts, and in all parts utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looks more like the top of a dunghill than of a cottage. " Such is the exterior ; and when the hind...
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The Perils of the Nation: An Appeal to the Legislatvre, the Clergy, and High ...

Robert Benton Seeley - Great Britain - 1843 - 382 pages
...rotten and displaced ; and the thatch yawning to admit the wind and wet in some parts, and in all parts utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looks more the top of a dunghill than a cottage. Such is the exterior ; and when the hind comes to...
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Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volume 1

1845
...and from age, or badness of the material, looking as if they could scarcely hold together. The gaping chinks admitted every blast ; the leaning chimneys...doors of these dwellings, and often surrounding them, ran open drains full of animal and vegetable refuse, decomposing into disease, or sometimes in their...
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Sybil; Or, The Two Nations, Volume 2

Benjamin Disraeli (Earl of Beaconsfield) - Chartism - 1845
...and from age, or badness of the material, looking as if they could scarcely hold together. The gaping chinks admitted every blast ; the leaning chimneys...doors of these dwellings, and often surrounding them, ran open drains full of animal and vegetable refuse, decomposing into disease, or sometimes in their...
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Sybil: Or, The Two Nations

Benjamin Disraeli - 1845 - 438 pages
...and from age, or badness of the material, looking as if they could scarcely hold together. The gaping chinks admitted every blast; the leaning chimneys...looked more like the top of a dunghill than a cottage. Bef ve the doors of these dwellings, and often surrounding them , ran open drains full of animal and...
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Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volume 1

Douglas William Jerrold - 1845
...and from age, or badness of the material, looking as if they could scarcely hold together. The gaping chinks admitted every blast ; the leaning chimneys...for its original purpose of giving protection from tlie weather, looked more like the top of a dunghill than a cottage. Before the doors of these dwellings,...
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Sybil, Or, The Two Nations, Part 1

Benjamin Disraeli - Chartism - 1845 - 438 pages
...and, from age or badness of the material, looking as if they could scarcely hold together. The gaping chinks admitted every blast; the leaning chimneys...all utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protectionfrom the weather, looked more like the top of a dunghill than a cottage. Before the doors...
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Chambers's Papers for the People, Volume 2

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1850
...and displaced; and the thatch, yawning to admit the wind and the wet in some parts, and in all parts utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looks more like the top of a dunghill than of a cottage.' ' Such is the exterior; and when the hind...
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The age and its architects, ten chapters on the English people

Edwin Paxton Hood - 1850
...and displaced, and the thatch, yawning to admit thewind and the wet in some places, and in all parts utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looks more like the top of a dunghill than a cottage. The hind when he takes possession finds it no...
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The social condition and education of the people in England and ..., Volume 1

Joseph Kay - Education - 1850
...rotten and displaced ; and the thatch yawning to admit the wind and wet in some parts, and in all parts utterly unfit for its original purpose of giving protection from the weather, looks more like the top of a dunghill than of a cottage. " Such is the interior ; and when the hind...
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