History of the United States Cavalry: From the Formation of the Federal Government to the 1st of June, 1863 ; to which is Added a List of All the Cavalry Regiments, with the Names of Their Commanders, which Have Been in the United States Service Since the Breaking Out of the Rebellion

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Harper & Bros., 1865 - United States - 337 pages
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Page 18 - Scott to gain and turn the right flank of the savages, with the whole of the mounted volunteers, by a circuitous route. At the same time I ordered the front line to advance and ' charge with trailed arms, and rouse the Indians from their covert at the point of the bayonet, and when up to deliver a close and well-directed fire on their backs, followed by a brisk charge, so as not to give them time to load again or to form their lines.
Page 28 - We lost five men killed and forty-one wounded, none mortally, the greater part slightly, a number with arrows; this appears to form a very principal part of the enemy's arms for warfare, every man having a bow with a bundle of arrows, which is used after the first fire with the gun, until a leisure time for loading offers.
Page 19 - All these orders were obeyed with spirit and promptitude ; but such was the impetuosity of the charge by the first line of infantry that the Indians and Canadian militia and volunteers were...
Page 17 - It is with infinite pleasure that I announce to you the brilliant success of the Federal army under my command in a general action with the combined force of the hostile Indians and a considerable number of the volunteers and militia of Detroit...
Page 18 - Barbee. A select battalion of mounted volunteers moved in front of the legion, commanded by Major Price, who was directed to keep sufficiently advanced so as to give timely notice for the troops to form in case of action, it being yet undetermined whether the Indians would decide for peace or war. After advancing about five miles.
Page 339 - DRAPER'S INTELLECTUAL DEvELOPMENT OF EUROPE. A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe.
Page 18 - ... probably occasioned by a tornado, which rendered it impracticable for the cavalry to act with effect, and afforded the enemy the most favorable covert for their mode of warfare. The savages were formed in three lines, within supporting distance of each other, and extending for near two miles, at right angles with the river. I soon discovered...
Page 21 - President to raise twelve additional regiments of infantry and six troops of light dragoons, " to be enlisted for and during the continuance of the existing differences between the United States and the French republic, unless sooner discharged.
Page 50 - I shall go to and live with her. She died suddenly. I was out on a bear-hunt, and, when seated by my camp-fire alone, I heard a strange noise ; it was something like a voice, which told me to go to her. The camp was some distance, but I took my rifle and started. The night was dark and gloomy ; the wolves howled about me as I went from hummock to hummock ; sounds came often to my ear — I thought she was speaking to me. At daylight I reached her camp : she was dead. When hunting some time after...
Page 51 - I shook with fear, I knew her voice, but could not speak. With one hand, she gave me a string of white beads ; in the other, she held a cup sparkling with pure water, which she said came from the spring of the Great Spirit : and if I would drink from it, I should return and live with her for ever.

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