London Medical Gazette: Or, Journal of Practical Medicine, Volume 20

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Longman, 1837
 

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Page 496 - Heraclitus ? The poisoned soldier, when his belly brake, put out two pyres in Plutarch. But in the plague of Athens, one private pyre served two or three intruders ; and the Saracens burnt in large heaps, by the King of Castile, shewed how little fuel sufficeth. Though the funeral pyre of
Page 498 - hydropical Heraclitus ? The poisoned soldier, when his belly brake, put out two pyres in Plutarch. But in the plague of Athens, one private pyre served two or three intruders ; and the Saracens burnt in large heaps, by the King of Castile, shewed how little fuel
Page 500 - Heraclitus ? The poisoned soldier, when his belly brake, put out two pyres in Plutarch. But in the plague of Athens, one private pyre served two or three intruders ; and the Saracens burnt in large heaps, by the King of Castile,
Page 269 - some person present at the death, or in attendance during the last illness," or " in case of the death, illness, or inability, or default of all such persons, the occupier
Page 495 - few days, while the Persian bodies remained dry and uncorrupted. Bodies in the same ground do not uniformly dissolve, nor bones equally moulder; whereof in the opprobrious disease we expect no long duration. The body of the Marquess of Dorset seemed sound and handsomely cereclothed, that after seventy-eight years was found uncorrupted. Common tombs preserve not beyond powder : a firmer consistence and
Page 269 - will he often be unable to ascertain the truth in this respect, if he is to depend solely on the reports of persons ignorant of medicine, and of the names and nature of diseases; and it cannot be expected that from his own knowledge he will be able so far to correct their errors as to
Page 269 - as far as it is possible, the " cause of death." It is obvious that on this subject the requisite information can seldom be given to the registrar, except by the medical attendant on the deceased person, and that even if the registrar be a medical practitioner (which in many instances will be the case),
Page 163 - From the mastication there proceeds a juice which tinges the saliva of a bright red, and which the leaf and nut, without the lime, will not yield. This hue being communicated to the mouth and lips, is esteemed ornamental; and an agreeable flavour is imparted to the breath. The juice is usually, but not always, swallowed.
Page 192 - often produced by a fit of coughing. As there can be no doubt, then, that a momentary congestion may produce a momentary pain, we may infer that in many instances gouty twitches are owing to some cause which determines an instantaneous congestion of the affected part. Sometimes the congestion is more lasting, and

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