The Newgate Calendar: Comprising Interesting Memoirs of the Most Notorious Characters who Have Been Convicted of Outrages on the Laws of England Since the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century; with Occasional Anecdotes and Observations, Speeches, Confessions, and Last Exclamations of Sufferers, Volume 2

Front Cover
J. Robins and Company, 1825 - Crime
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - in the twilight, in the black and dark night ; and behold there met him a woman with the attire of an harlot, and subtil of heart. (She is loud and stubborn ; her feet abide not in her house ; now she is without, now in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner.) So she
Page 96 - to the snare, and knoweth not that it is for his life. Hearken unto me now, therefore, O ye children, and attend to the words of my mouth : Let not thine heart incline to her
Page 96 - For at the window of my house I looked through my casement, and beheld among the simple ones; I discerned among the youths a young man void of understanding, passing through the street near her corner; and he went
Page 96 - the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks ; till a dart strike through his liver as a bird hastencth to the snare, and knoweth not that it is
Page 83 - Pray I cannot, Though inclination be as sharp as 'twill ; My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent ; And, like a man to double business bound, I stand in pause
Page 96 - works, with fine linen of Egypt. I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon. Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning ; let us solace ourselves with love.
Page 96 - subtil of heart. (She is loud and stubborn ; her feet abide not in her house ; now she is without, now in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner.) So she caught him, and kissed him, and with an impudent face said
Page 155 - is the road to riches and honour; let them remember and apply the words of the poet :— ' In works of labour or of skill, I would be busy too; For Satan finds some
Page 253 - the living what zeal in its fury may have done—what nature may have taken off, and piety interred—or what war alone may have destroyed, alone deposited. ' As to the circumstances that have been raked together, I have nothing to observe but that all circumstances whatever are precarious, and have been but too frequently found lamentably fallible
Page 254 - about that time; that no rational inference can be drawn that a person is dead who suddenly disappears; that hermitages were the constant repositories of the bones of a recluse; that the proofs of this are well authenticated ; that the revolutions in religion, or the fortune of war, have mangled or buried the dead; the conclusion remains, perhaps, no less

Bibliographic information