Cable Cowboy: John Malone and the Rise of the Modern Cable Business

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John Wiley & Sons, Nov 14, 2002 - Business & Economics - 320 pages
24 Reviews
An inside look at a cable titan and his industry
John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.
  

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Review: Cable Cowboy: John Malone and the Rise of the Modern Cable Business

User Review  - Julian Bu - Goodreads

good intro about the cable biz and malone as an businessman/capital allocator. Read full review

Review: Cable Cowboy: John Malone and the Rise of the Modern Cable Business

User Review  - Goodreads

good intro about the cable biz and malone as an businessman/capital allocator. Read full review

Contents

1 License to Steal
1
2 Running the Show
18
3 Cash Flow
33
4 Thrilla in Manila
49
5 Overgrown Monster
75
6 Cable Cosa Nostra
102
7 Five Hundred Channels
122
8 Nice Try My Friend
137
11 Death of a Cowboy
193
12 Trojan Horse?
208
13 What Pop Would Have Wanted
225
14 Give Me Liberty
242
15 Déjà Vu
269
Epilogue
281
Acknowledgments
289
Notes
291

9 Chasing Too Many Rabbits?
156
10 Dr Kevorkian
177

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About the author (2002)

MARK ROBICHAUX is the executive editor of Broadcasting & Cable magazine. From 1989 to 2001, he wrote feature stories as a staff reporter at the Wall Street Journal, covering, among other things, the cable TV industry, small business and alligator farmers. While on book leave in 1999, he was awarded a fellowship at the Media Studies Center in New York.

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