Nolans̓ System for Training Cavalry Horses

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D. Van Nostrand, 1862 - Cavalry - 114 pages
 

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Page 24 - When the bend is complete, the horse holds his head without any restraint and champs the bit; then make much of him and let him resume his natural position by degrees, without throwing his head around hurriedly. A horse, as a rule, champs the bit when he ceases to resist. The horse's neck is bent to the left in a similar manner, the...
Page 120 - Gunnery in 1858 : A Treatise on Rifles, Cannon, and Sporting Arms. By William Greener, Author of "The Gun.
Page 21 - ... of yielding. The horse, tired of trying ineffectually to avoid the whip, soon ceases to pull, and moves forward ; then drop the point of the whip and make much of him. This repeated once or twice usually proves sufficient. The horse, having found how to avoid the punishment, no longer waits for the application of the whip, but anticipates it by moving up at a gesture.
Page 84 - Favour every inclination of the horse to smell or touch you with his nose. Always follow each touch or communication of this kind with the most tender and affectionate caresses, accompanied with a kind look, and pleasant word of some sort, such as, " Ho ! my little boy— ho ! my little boy !" " Pretty boy !" " Nice lady !" or something of that kind, constantly repeating the same words, with the same kind, steady tone of voice ; for the horse soon learns to read the expression of the face and voice,...
Page 84 - ... soft hand, merely touching the horse, always rubbing the way the hair lies, so that your hand will pass along as smoothly as possible. As you stand by his side, you may find it more convenient to rub his neck or the side of his head, which will answer the same purpose as rubbing his forehead. Favour every inclination of the horse to smell or touch you with his nose. Always follow each touch or communication of this kind with the most tender and affectionate caresses, accompanied with a kind look,...
Page 108 - A is the clip at the toe, B 1 the outer quarter, B 2 the inner quarter, C 1 the outer heel, C 2 the inner heel, D the seating, E the flat surface for the crust to bear upon, F the heels bevelled off away from the frog.
Page 102 - You must next open the nail-holes; but be sure that they have been stamped so as to pass straight through the shoe, and come out in the flat part of the web and not partly in the flat and partly in the seating. It is a very bad plan to make them slant inwards, as most smiths do; for in driving a nail they have first to pitch the point inwards, then turn it outwards, driving it all the time with the grain of the crust, and at last they bring it out high up in the thinnest part of the hoof, and have...
Page 92 - A cart colt, tormented by flies, will kick forward nearly up to the fore-legs. If a horse, unstrapped, attempts to rise, you may easily stop him by taking hold of a fore-leg and doubling it back to the strapped position. If by chance he should be too quick, don't resist ; it is an essential principle...
Page 20 - Go up to the horse, pat him on the neck, and speak to him; then take the reins off the horse's neck, and hold them at a few inches from the rings of the bit with the left hand; take such position as to offer as much resistance as possible to the horse, should he attempt to break, away; hold the whip...
Page 90 - ... but this assistance should be so slight that the horse must not be able to resist it. The horse will often make a final spring when you think he is quite beaten ; but, at any rate, at length he slides over, and lies down, panting and exhausted, on his side. If he is full of corn and well bred, take advantage of the moment to tie up the off fore-leg to the surcingle, as securely as the other, in a slip loop knot.

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