My Bondage and My Freedom ...

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Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1855 - Abolitionists - 464 pages
5 Reviews
Autobiography of the nineteenth-century abolitionist who advocated the full freedom of black people.
 

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User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

This is a great book, by a great American. Skeptics looking at that statement might think, well sure you think that reading his own account. Except I've found autobiographies unintentionally revealing ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rameau - LibraryThing

This is one of the greatest autobiographies I've ever read. It blends a story of triumph over adversity, a retelling of a man's education, and an almost-Tocquevillean analysis of a society and how its ... Read full review

Contents

I
xvii
II
33
III
43
IV
51
V
61
VI
79
VII
89
VIII
107
XIV
173
XV
185
XVI
205
XVII
222
XVIII
233
XIX
250
XX
271
XXI
304

IX
119
X
129
XI
141
XII
151
XIII
163
XXII
321
XXIII
336
XXIV
357
XXV
365
XXVI
392

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Page 44 - The tear, down Childhood's cheek that flows, Is like the dew-drop on the rose ; When next the summer breeze comes by, And waves the bush, the flower is dry.
Page 200 - We declare that we are as much as ever convinced of the great evil of slavery ; therefore, no slaveholder shall be eligible to any official station in our Church hereafter ; where the laws of the state in which he lives will admit of emancipation, and permit the liberated slave to enjoy freedom.
Page 446 - BY THE rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof: for there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; And they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, " Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 448 - What, then, remains to be argued? Is it that slavery is not divine; that God did not establish it; that our doctors of divinity are mistaken? There is blasphemy in the thought. That which is inhuman, cannot be divine! Who can reason on such a proposition ? They that can, may; I cannot. The time for such argument is past. At a time like this, scorching irony, not convincing argument, is needed.
Page 224 - Sabbath, stood all alone upon the lofty banks of that noble bay, and traced, with saddened heart and tearful eye, the countless number of sails moving off to the mighty ocean.
Page 248 - I did, come what might; that he had used me like a brute for six months, and that I was determined to be used so no longer. With that, he strove to drag me to a stick that was lying just out of the stable door. He meant to knock me down.
Page 150 - As to himself, learning will do him no good, but a great deal of harm, making him disconsolate and unhappy. If you teach him how to read, hell want to know how to write, and this accomplished, he'll be running away with himself.
Page 235 - For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.
Page 445 - God, both for your sakes and ours, that an affirmative answer could be truthfully returned to these questions! Then would my task be light, and my burden easy and delightful. For who is there so cold, that a nation's sympathy could not warm him? Who so obdurate and dead to the claims of gratitude, that would not thankfully acknowledge such priceless benefits? Who so stolid and selfish, that would not give his voice to swell the hallelujahs of a nation's jubilee, when the chains of servitude had been...
Page 228 - I nerved myself up, feeling it would never do to stop work. I stood as long as I could stagger to the hopper with grain. When I could stand no longer, I fell, and felt as if held down by an immense weight. The fan of course stopped; every one...

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