Lives of Eminent British Statesmen ...: John Pym; John Hampden. By John Forster

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Printed for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1837 - Statesmen
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Page 13 - My conceit of his person was never increased toward him by his place, or honours : but I have and do reverence him, for the greatness that was only proper to himself, in that he seemed to me ever, by his work, one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration, that had been in many ages. In his adversity I ever prayed, that God would give him strength ; for greatness he could not want.
Page 12 - I hope I shall not be found to have the troubled fountain of a corrupt heart, in a depraved habit of taking rewards to pervert justice ; howsoever I may be frail, and partake of the abuses of the times.
Page 7 - ... truth, than there be pens and heads there, sitting by their studious lamps, musing, searching, revolving new notions and ideas wherewith to present, as with their homage and their fealty, the approaching reformation : others as fast reading, trying all things, assenting to the force of reason and convincement.
Page 353 - O Lord, thou knowest how busy I must be this day. If I forget thee, do not thou forget me.
Page 274 - Domini, and that is enough to silence all passion in me. The God of peace in his good time send us peace, and in the meantime fit us to receive it ! We are both on the stage, and we must act the parts that are assigned us in this tragedy. Let us do it in a way of honour, and without personal animosities.
Page 333 - I am persuaded his power and interest at that time were greater to do good or hurt than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time; for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias...
Page 71 - ... those foundations of right by which men valued their security, to the apprehension and understanding of wise men, never more in danger to be destroyed.
Page 199 - Their orators thou then extoll'st, as those The top of eloquence; statists indeed, And lovers of their country, as may seem ; But herein to our prophets far beneath, As men divinely taught, and better teaching The solid rules of civil government, In their majestic unaffected style, Than all the oratory of Greece and Rome. In them is plainest taught, and easiest learnt, What makes a nation happy, and keeps it so, What ruins kingdoms, and lays cities flat; These only with our law best form a king.
Page 379 - He was indeed a very wise man, and of great parts, and possessed with the most absolute spirit of popularity, and the most absolute faculties to govern the people, of any man I ever knew.
Page 268 - The law is that which puts a difference betwixt good and evil, — betwixt just and unjust. If you take away the law, all things will fall into a confusion. Every man will become a law to himself, which, in the depraved condition of human nature, must needs produce many great enormities. Lust will become a law, and envy will become a law ; covetousness and ambition will become laws...

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