The Letters of John Keats

Front Cover
Reeves & Turner, 1895 - Poets, English - 522 pages
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Contents

I
xiii
II
1
III
2
IV
3
V
4
VI
5
VII
7
VIII
12
XCIX
335
C
336
CI
338
CII
340
CIII
342
CVI
343
CVII
344
CVIII
345

IX
15
X
21
XI
22
XII
23
XIII
25
XIV
29
XV
33
XVI
37
XVII
38
XVIII
40
XIX
43
XX
46
XXI
48
XXII
51
XXIII
55
XXIV
58
XXV
63
XXVII
64
XXVIII
67
XXIX
68
XXX
72
XXXI
76
XXXII
77
XXXIII
80
XXXIV
86
XXXVI
88
XXXVII
91
XXXVIII
93
XXXIX
94
XL
95
XLI
99
XLII
102
XLIII
106
XLIV
109
XLV
113
XLVI
116
XLVII
118
XLVIII
119
XLIX
121
L
124
LI
132
LII
135
LIII
138
LIV
140
LV
141
LVI
146
LVII
153
LVIII
157
LIX
162
LX
168
LXI
175
LXII
183
LXIII
189
LXIV
196
LXV
199
LXVI
200
LXVII
201
LXIX
204
LXX
206
LXXII
208
LXXIII
209
LXXIV
211
LXXV
228
LXXVII
230
LXXIX
231
LXXX
232
LXXXI
233
LXXXII
234
LXXXIV
235
LXXXV
262
LXXXVI
263
LXXXVII
264
LXXXVIII
265
LXXXIX
268
XC
270
XCI
271
XCII
272
XCIII
275
XCIV
276
XCV
278
XCVI
279
XCVII
282
XCVIII
334
CIX
348
CX
350
CXI
352
CXII
353
CXIII
355
CXIV
358
CXV
361
CXVI
363
CXVII
364
CXVIII
367
CXIX
369
CXX
370
CXXI
373
CXXII
374
CXXIII
378
CXXIV
379
CXXV
382
CXXVI
385
CXXVII
388
CXXVIII
389
CXXIX
425
CXXX
426
CXXXII
429
CXXXIII
430
CXXXIV
431
CXXXV
433
CXXXVII
434
CXXXVIII
435
CXXXIX
436
CXL
437
CXLI
438
CXLII
441
CXLIV
452
CXLV
454
CXLVI
455
CXLVII
456
CXLVIII
457
CXLIX
458
CLI
459
CLII
460
CLIII
461
CLIV
463
CLVI
464
CLVII
465
CLVIII
466
CLIX
467
CLX
468
CLXI
469
CLXII
470
CLXIII
471
CLXIV
472
CLXVI
474
CLXVII
476
CLXVIII
477
CLXIX
478
CLXXI
479
CLXXII
480
CLXXIV
481
CLXXV
482
CLXXVI
483
CLXXVII
484
CLXXIX
486
CLXXX
487
CLXXXI
488
CLXXXII
489
CLXXXIII
491
CLXXXIV
492
CLXXXV
494
CLXXXVI
496
CLXXXVII
497
CLXXXVIII
498
CLXXXIX
501
CXC
503
CXCI
504
CXCII
506
CXCIII
507
CXCIV
508
CXCV
509
CXCVI
511
CXCVII
512
CXCVIII
514
CXCIX
516
CC
518

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 207 - The Genius of Poetry must work out its own salvation in a man. It cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself.
Page 256 - Of their sorrows and delights; Of their passions and their spites; Of their glory and their shame; What doth strengthen and what maim. Thus ye teach us, every day, Wisdom, though fled far away. Bards of Passion and of Mirth, Ye have left your souls on earth!
Page 257 - Tales and golden histories Of heaven and its mysteries. Thus ye live on high, and then On the earth ye live again; And the souls ye left behind you Teach us, here, the way to find you, Where your other souls are joying, Never slumber'd, never cloying.
Page 84 - SOULS of Poets dead and gone, What Elysium have ye known, Happy field or mossy cavern, Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern?
Page 9 - ON THE SEA It keeps eternal whisperings around Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell Gluts twice ten thousand Caverns, till the spell Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound. Often 'tis in such gentle temper found, That scarcely will the very smallest shell Be moved for days from where it sometime fell, When last the winds of Heaven were unbound.
Page 90 - Now it is more noble to sit like Jove than to fly like Mercury — let us not therefore go hurrying about and collecting honey, bee-like buzzing here and there impatiently from a knowledge of what is to be aimed at; but let us open our leaves like a flower and be passive and receptive...
Page 302 - In this state of effeminacy the fibres of the brain are relaxed in common with the rest of the body, and to such a happy degree that pleasure has no show of enticement and pain no unbearable frown.
Page 305 - WHY did I laugh to-night ? No voice will tell; No God, no Demon of severe response, Deigns to reply from Heaven or from Hell: Then to my human heart I turn at once. Heart ! Thou and I are here sad and alone...
Page 252 - Ceres' daughter, Ere the God of Torment taught her How to frown and how to chide; With a waist and with a side White as Hebe's, when her zone...
Page 207 - Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own Works. My own domestic criticism has given me pain without comparison beyond what Blackwood...

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