Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Apr 24, 2012 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
16 Reviews
Anthony has two dollars and three quarters and one dime and seven nickels and eighteen pennies. Nicholas has one dollar and two quarters and five dimes and five nickels and thirteen pennies.

Alexander has...bus tokens.

And even when he's rich, pretty soon all he has is bus tokens.

He was rich. Last Sunday.

Grandma Betty and Grandpa Louie came and gave Anthony and Nicholas and Alexander each a dollar. Alexander was saving his. Maybe for a walkie-talkie.

And then there was bubble gum, some bets with Anthony and Nicholas (that Alexander lost), a snake rental, a garage sale, and all kinds of other things to spend money on.

And now all he has is bus tokens. When he used to be rich last Sunday.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ccampeaux - LibraryThing

I think this would be a great book to read to your students when you are about to start talking about money. this book shows how using your money can make it go away very fast. This book shows that children should save their money if they really want something. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - biancagrhm - LibraryThing

The message shows that children should spend wisely and save for valuable things. The book could be used for a mathematical lesson by counting down a dollar how it is spent as Alexander did. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Judith Viorst was born and brought up in New Jersey and has lived in Washington, DC, since 1960, when she married Milton Viorst, a political writer. A graduate in 1981 of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, Viorst writes in many different areas: science books, children’s chapter and picture books—including the beloved Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, which has sold some four million copies; adult fiction and nonfiction including the New York Times bestseller, Necessary Losses; poetry for children and adults, and four musicals. Her most recent book of poetry for children, What Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? was published in 2016. Lulu Is Getting a Sister is the fourth book in the Lulu series.

Ray Cruz is the illustrator of the modern classics Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and Alexander, Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday.

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