Fifteen Months' Pilgrimage Through Untrodden Tracts of Khuzistan and Persia, Volume 2

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Saunders and Otley, 1832 - Europe
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Page 130 - First Witch. When shall we three meet again In thunder, lightning, or in rain? ^ > '\ • Second Witch. When the hurlyburly's done, When the battle's lost and won. Third Witch. That will be ere the set of sun. First Witch. Where the place ? Second Witch. Upon the heath. Third Witch. There to meet with Macbeth.
Page 60 - ... residing incog. Not many minutes after we had been installed in our new domicile, my companion proposed that we should send up our names to the general, and solicit permission to pay our respects, a proposition so consonant to my own wishes that I did not hesitate a moment to acquiesce. The garfon warned us that there was little chance of our suit being granted, inasmuch as Skyrznecki had been for two months and a half a tenant of his apartment and invariably declined all visits ; but we entertained...
Page 77 - ... angry spirit that had been showed. He then conveyed Skyrznecki to his own chateau, gave him fresh horses, and accompanied him without further molestation to Cracow. It might have been supposed that in this independent little republic his troubles would have ended, but the treason which sapped the foundation of his eminence, and hastened the Polish catastrophe, had spread its poisonous influence to the very confines of Poland. Even in Cracow, clubbifts, who had sought .ч retreat from the disasters...
Page 71 - Skyrznecki had not, however, proceeded three versts from the town, when he was overtaken and arrested by six lancers, who had orders from the irresolute Burgmeister to carry him back. Skyrznecki, finding it vain to attempt resistance, submitted to the mandate, and returned. On his arrival at the town, he found a room prepared for him, and strictly guarded. He sent for the Burgmeister, who accordingly presented himself, and things having thus reached a very hazardous crisis, Skyrznecki deemed it necessary...
Page 79 - I left Linz. In letters from Berlin and Prague, I communicated to him the opinion entertained of his conduct by several Polish refugees of distinction, and these memorable words were contained in his reply. " I may have committed some faults — what general has not committed them? But I can declare solemnly to whoever it may be, that I was an upright man in my political career.'1 " He has spoken the truth," said the old Count Mostowski, (late Prime Minister at Warsaw,) to whom I showed the letter.
Page 64 - Shyrznecki volunteered an account of the whole business from its commencement down to the capture of Warsaw. I endeavoured, on retiring to my chamber, to commit to paper all that I had thus heard, with a view to its subsequent publication ; but on submitting the manuscript to my illustrious friend, he seemed to think that the dignity of the theme demanded something beyond a mere narrative — that it was of consequence enough...
Page 170 - ... avec celle des hommes. Le grand charme de la vie sociale, en France, consiste dans l'art de concilier parfaitement ensemble les avantages que l'esprit des femmes et celui des hommes réunis peuvent apporter dans la conversation. A Berlin , les hommes ne causent guère qu'entre eux...
Page 68 - While he remained at the inn, two gens-d' armes came in, and demanded his passports, which having been shown, accompanied by a rouble, they left the place. The innkeeper, a Pole, perceiving however that his guest was a more distinguished individual than his papers set forth, earnestly counselled him not to pass through the town, " For you must know, Sir," said he, " the commandant of the place is accustomed to sit at his window, to watch all travellers, to stop and question them ; and believe me,...

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