Roosevelt and Churchill: Men of Secrets

Front Cover
Overlook Press, 2000 - History - 359 pages
The relationship between Roosevelt and Churchill was unique, famously based on interlinked national histories, shared pedigrees, and corresponding worldviews. But above all, it was cemented by shared enemies: Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. On these foundations Roosevelt and Churchill constructed a fighting alliance unlike any other in history.

The two men also developed an extraordinary personal relationship‹-communicating almost daily by telegram, telephone, personal meetings, or through intermediaries‹that lasted until FDRs death on April 12, 1945, just hours before American and British troops liberated Buchenwald and Bergen-Belsen. Stafford dispels much of the sentimental mythology surrounding the almost legendary relationship and reveals how, despite mutual trust, each man guarded knowledge from the other in pursuit of separate national interests, while at the same time building a joint intelligence structure.

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ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL: Men of Secrets

User Review  - Kirkus

A behind-the-scenes analysis of the relationship between a president and a prime minister—"a powerful personal link that bridged the Atlantic and helped win the war."Stafford (Churchill and Secret ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nbmars - LibraryThing

This book describes the relationship between Roosevelt and Churchill during WW2 from the standpoint of Allied intelligence efforts. Stafford's story reveals a “volatile mix of friendship, rivalry and ... Read full review

Contents

Men of Secrets
1
Exchanging Views
17
Knowing Friends
32
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

David Stafford, a former diplomat and Project Director of the Centre for Second World War Studies at the University of Edinburgh, is the author of Spies Beneath Berlin and Secret Agent, published by Overlook.

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