The Islamic Intellectual Tradition in Persia

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1996 - Religion - 375 pages
This volume gathers together the numerous essays by the Iranian metaphysician and ontologist, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, on Islamic philosophers and the intricate relationship between Persian culture and its philosophical schools. Brought together into a single volume for the first time, these essays span four decades of Nasr's prolific and learned scholarship on the development of Islamic philosophy, as well as the general history of Islam, and expound his belief that philosophy is not merely a rational but a sacred activity - a quest for the Eternal resulting from a longing within us all to return to our original, and true, selves.
 

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Contents

Mysticism and Traditional Philosophy in Persia PreIslamic and Islamic
3
Cosmography in PreIslamic and Islamic Persia The Question of the Continuity of Iranian Culture
10
The Tradition of Islamic Philosophy in Persia and its Significance for the Modern World
28
The Significance of Persian Philosophical Works in the Tradition of Islamic Philosophy
47
Why was alFarabl called the Second Teacher?
59
A General Survey
66
Ibn SInas Prophetic Philosophy
76
Birunl as Philosophe
92
A General Survey
125
The Persian Works of Shaykh alIshraq Suhrawardl
154
The Spread of the Illuminationist School of Suhrawardl
160
PhilosopherPoetScientist
175
Afdal alDIn Kasham and the Philosophical World of Khwajah
189
Muhammad ibn Muhammad NasTr alDIn Tusl
207
Qutb alDIn ShTrazT
216
The Status of Rashld alDIn Fadallab in the History of Islamic
228

Birum versus Ibn Slna on the Nature of the Universe
100
The PhilosopherPoet
103
Fakhr alDIn Razl
107
SUHRAWARDI AND THE SCHOOL OF ISHRAQ
123
The School of Isfahan
239
Sadr alDIn ShTrazT
271
Mulla HadT Sabziwari
304
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About the author (1996)

Born in Tehran, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, the son of an educator, received a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1958, after which he returned to Iran to teach and eventually to become a university chancellor. He was compelled to leave his native country after the revolution of 1979 and since then has taught in universities in the United States. Deeply influenced by the mystical Sufi tradition, Nasr is less concerned with reconciling the faith with modernism and is more concerned with presenting a traditionalist, though mystical, interpretation of religion that offers a way out of the contradictions of modernity. Through authentic spiritual experience, Nasr holds, one can penetrate the superficiality of modern scientific and other knowledge to find eternal truth. He is associated with the neotraditionalist school of philosophy. Undoubtedly, Nasr has had more general influence in the Western philosophical world than any other contemporary philosopher in the Islamic tradition.

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