Cultures of Opposition: Jewish Immigrant Workers, New York City, 1881-1905

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SUNY Press, Jun 22, 2000 - Business & Economics - 220 pages
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This work provides a reinterpretation of the origins of Jewish working-class oppositional culture in the United States. It tells how this culture was characterized by public practices such as strikes, attacks on scabs and police, rent strikes, consumer boycotts, and street parades. The participants in this social unrest ultimately forged an unmistakably new Jewish political culture informed by concepts of social justice, community solidarity and effective community-wide political participation. Enhancing Kosak's fascinating narrative are eleven period photographs.
 

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Contents

Jewish Immigrants to the United States 1881 to 1905 The Decline of the Old Communities
15
The Emigrants
16
Jewish Citizenship in Action
23
The Decline of Traditional Communities
26
The Impetus to Emigrate
28
Conflicted Cultures West and East European Jews
37
The Brody Episode
39
Settlement
43
The Origins of Jewish Labor Organizations
99
Themes of Collective Action
107
The Culture of Collective Action
108
Interpretations of Labor Unrest
114
Struggles for Control of the Workplace
118
Struggles for Closed Shop and against Scabs
120
Struggles against Sweatshops and the Contracting System
125
Struggles against the Task System
127

Official Philanthropy and Communal Networks
49
SelfHelp Networks and the Making of Social Solidarity
56
Jewish Immigrants and the New York Clothing Industry
61
From Craft to Industry
64
Routes of Entry into the Garment Industry
69
Earnings and Work Hours
74
Making a Home and Earning a Living on the Lower East Side
81
Demography and Economy
83
SelfHelp and Social Organization
87
Geography Economy and Ideology
92
The Politics of Morality Jewish Workers and the Ethnic Community
131
Agencies of Cultural Transmission
134
Appropriating the Power of the Law
140
The Jewish Community and Established Justice
147
Community as an Economic and Social Weapon
149
Conclusion
159
Notes
165
Index
215
Copyright

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Page 9 - American society and conclude that it is "a process of construction or invention which incorporates, adapts, and amplifies preexisting communal solidarities, cultural attributes, and historical memories.
Page 2 - Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) represented the other, ie favoring a very strongly unified union movement encompassing all of Canada.
Page 214 - Morris Hillquit, Loose Leaves from a Busy Life (New York: Macmillan, 1934), pp.

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About the author (2000)

Hadassa Kosak is Assistant Professor of History at Yeshiva University.

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