A glimpse of Hayti and her negro chief [signed C.M.B.].

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1850
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Page 101 - Saturn, quiet as a stone, Still as the silence round about his lair ; Forest on forest hung about his head Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there, Not so much life as on a summer's day Robs not one light seed from the feathered grass, But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest.
Page 61 - It was computed that, within two months after the revolt first began, upwards of two thousand white persons, of all conditions and ages, had been massacred ; — that one hundred and eighty sugar plantations, and about nine hundred coffee, cotton, and indigo settlements had been destroyed (the buildings thereon being consumed by fire), and one thousand two hundred Christian families reduced from opulence to such a state of misery, as to depend altogether for their clothing and sustenance on public...
Page 37 - He always maintained a haughty deportment towards Columbus, while he never evinced the least animosity against Ojeda for the artifice to which he had fallen a victim. It rather increased his admiration of him, as a consummate warrior, looking upon it as the exploit of a master-spirit to have pounced upon him, and borne him off, in this hawklike manner, from the very midst of his fighting-men. There is nothing that an Indian more admires in warfare, than a deep well-executed stratagem. ' Columbus...
Page 61 - ... and one thousand two hundred Christian families reduced from opulence, to such a state of misery, as to depend altogether for their clothing and sustenance on public and private charity. Of the insurgents, it was reckoned that upwards of ten thousand had perished by the sword or by famine; and some hundreds by the hands of the executioner...
Page 37 - When he entered the apartment, therefore, where Caonabo was confined, all present rose, according to custom, and paid him reverence. The cacique alone neither moved nor took any notice of him. On the contrary, when Ojeda entered, though small in person, and without external state...
Page 31 - Isabella, or some attempt upon the person of the Admiral. He knew also that it was the wish of Columbus either to make peace with the cacique, or to get possession of his person without the alternative of open warfare. He had recourse to a stratagem, therefore, which has an air of fable and romance, but which is recorded by all the...
Page 13 - These people," said he in his journal, intended for the perusal of the sovereigns, " love their neighbors as themselves; their discourse is ever sweet and gentle, and accompanied by a smile. I swear to your majesties, there is not in the world a better nation or a better land.
Page 43 - I forbad as being unjust, and myself gave them many beautiful and acceptable articles which I had brought with me, taking nothing from them in return; I did this in order that I might the more easily conciliate them, that they might be led to become Christians, and be inclined to entertain a regard for the King and Queen, our Princes and all Spaniards...
Page 33 - The cacique, with that fondness for glittering ornaments common to savages, was dazzled with the sight ; his proud military spirit, also, was flattered with the idea of bestriding one of those tremendous animals, so dreaded by his countrymen. He accompanied Ojeda and his followers to the river, with but few attendants, dreading nothing from nine or ten strangers when thus surrounded by his army. After the cacique had bathed in the river, he was assisted to mount behind Ojeda, and the shackles were...
Page 64 - Francois and Biassou, and luxuriating in the liberty which they had so suddenly acquired. It was at this moment of utter confusion and disorganisation, when British, French, mulattoes, and blacks, were all acting their respective parts in the turmoil, and all inextricably intermingled in a bewildering war, which was neither a foreign war nor a civil war, nor a war of races, but a composition of all three — it was at this moment that Toussaint L'Ouverture appeared, the spirit and the ruler of the...

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