Intercellular Signaling in Development and Disease: Cell Signaling Collection

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Edward A. Dennis, Ralph A. Bradshaw
Academic Press, Apr 5, 2011 - Science - 540 pages
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Required reading for anyone involved in cell signaling research with articles written and edited by experts in the field. This title covers disease states such as lymphoid leukemia, breast cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, systemic sclerosis, andinflammatory bowel disease, along with up-to-date research on signaling systems and mutations in
transcription factors that provide new targets for treating disease.

  • Articles written and edited by experts in the field
  • Thematic volume covering disease states such as lymphoid leukemia, breast cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, systemic sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease
  • Up-to-date research on signaling systems and mutations in transcription factors that provide new targets for treating disease
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    Contents

    CellCell Signaling
    9
    Signaling in Development
    213
    Signaling in Disease
    329

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    About the author (2011)

    Edward A. Dennis is Distinguished Professor and former Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Professor in the Department of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Lipid Research.

    Ralph A. Bradshaw is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Physiology and biophysics at the University of California, Irvine. Prior to that he was on the faculty of the Department of Biological Chemistry, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO and was Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. From 2006 to 2015, he was a member of the Mass Spectrometry Facility and Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco. He holds degrees from Colby College and Duke University and was a post-doctoral fellow at Indiana University and the University of Washington. He has served as president for FASEB, was the founding president of the Protein Society and was the treasurer of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research has focused on protein chemistry and proteomics, with emphasis on the structure and function of growth factors and their receptors, particularly nerve growth factor and fibroblast growth factor, and the involvement of receptor tyrosine kinases in cell signalling. He has also studied in the role of proteolytic processing and N-terminal modification in protein stability and turnover.

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