At the Back of the North Wind

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Schocken Books, 1963 - Fairy tales. - 276 pages
252 Reviews
Diamond, a young boy living in nineteenth-century London, has many adventures as he travels with the beautiful Lady North Wind and comes to know the many facets of her protective and violent temper.

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5 stars
96
4 stars
66
3 stars
59
2 stars
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1 star
9

His prose is excellent. - Goodreads
Finally the ending is tame and disappointing. - Goodreads
A curious mixture of plot and pseudo-religious themes. - Goodreads
You can tell this writer was an influence to CS Lewis. - Goodreads
Finally the ending is tame - Goodreads

Review: At the Back of the North Wind

User Review  - Wreade1872 - Goodreads

A sort of young forestgumplike character gets visited by a strange woman. The first third or so of the book is really good as you meet the suitably ethereal spirit of the North Wind and also get some ... Read full review

Review: At the Back of the North Wind

User Review  - Colin - Goodreads

Quite a treasure of a book, and well worth reading. One I knew not of, which is unusual for me, but glad I found it. The joy of bookshops. Read full review

Contents

The Hayloft
1
The Lawn
10
Old Diamond
18
Copyright

35 other sections not shown

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About the author (1963)

George MacDonald, December 10, 1824 - September 18. 1905 George MacDonald was born on December 10, 1824 in Huntley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He attended University in Aberdeen in 1840 and then went on to Highbury College in 1848 where he studied to be a Congregational Minister, receiving his M. A. His first appointment was in Arundel, but he was forced to resign form the position in 1853. He became a lecturer in English Literature at Kings College in London before finally focusing all of his attention on writing and living off the charity of friends and pupils. In 1955, MacDonald wrote his first important original work, a long religious poem entitled "Within and Without." Three years later in 1858, he wrote "Phantastes," his first contribution to the fantasy genre. It was influenced by both the English and Germanic Romantic writers and religious poets of the Renaissance. MacDonald is perhaps best known for his fantasy children's books, although he wrote fantasy books for adults as well. His most well known children's book is "At the Back of the North Wind," which was surprisingly a favorite of Mark Twain's children. In 1863, MacDonald published "David Eiginbrod, the first of a dozen novels that were set in Scotland and based on the lives of rural Scots. It was these series of novels that gained MacDonald worldwide fame and brought money to the foundering MacDonald family. MacDonald was a friend and confident of Lewis Carroll and John Ruskin. He exchanged letters with Mark Twain, and met Walt Whitman and many other American writers on his trips to America. MacDonald also inspired his later compatriots, such as C. S. Lewis, with his blend of fantasy and Christianity. George MacDonald died in Ashtead, Surrey, England, on September 18. 1905. His body is buried in Bordighea, Italy, a place he spent most of his later years in.

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