The Greatest Books in the World: Interpretative Studies, by Laura Spencer Portor

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Chautauqua Press, 1917 - Books and reading - 295 pages
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Page 238 - I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear : But now mine eye seeth thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes.
Page 193 - Poor child ! thought I, what sorrow art thou like to have for thy portion in this world ! Thou must be beaten ; must beg; suffer hunger, cold, nakedness, and a thousand calamities, though I cannot now endure the wind should blow upon thee!
Page 205 - In this combat no man can imagine, unless he had seen and heard, as I did, what yelling and hideous roaring Apollyon made all the time of the fight ; he spake like a dragon ; and, on the other side, what sighs and groans burst from Christian's heart. I never saw him all the while give so much as one pleasant look, till he perceived he had wounded Apollyon with his two-edged sword ; then, indeed, he did smile and look upward ! But it was the dreadfullest sight that ever I saw.
Page 208 - Now as they walked in this land, they had more rejoicing than in parts more remote from the kingdom to which they were bound; and drawing near to the city, they had yet a more perfect view thereof. It was builded of pearls and precious stones, also the...
Page 208 - Yea, here they heard continually the singing of birds, and saw every day the flowers appear in the earth, and heard the voice of the turtle in the land. — In this country the sun shineth night and day...
Page 11 - What is this song or picture, this engaging personality presented in life or in a book, to me) What effect does it really produce on me? Does it give me pleasure? and if so, what sort or degree of pleasure? How is my nature modified by its presence, and under its influence?
Page 251 - Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold. Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez, when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific — and all his men Looked at each other with a wild surmise — Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Page 231 - My brethren have dealt deceitfully as a brook, And as the stream of brooks they pass away; Which are blackish by reason of the ice, And wherein the snow is hid: What time they wax warm, they vanish: When it is hot, they are consumed out of their place.
Page 219 - hast thou clothed his neck with thunder?" — he " laughs at the shaking of the spear ! " Such living likenesses were never since drawn. Sublime sorrow, sublime reconciliation ; oldest choral melody as of the heart of mankind; — so soft, and great; as the summer midnight, as the world with its seas and .stars! There is nothing written, I think, in the Bible or out of it, of equal literary merit.
Page 23 - As one that for a weary space has lain Lulled by the song of Circe and her wine In gardens near the pale of Proserpine, Where that JEean isle forgets the main, And only the low lutes of love complain, And only shadows of wan lovers pine— As such an one were glad to know the brine Salt on his lips, and the large air again...

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