Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland: The new series. Two volumes in one

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John Murray, 1828 - Fairy tales - 626 pages
 

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Page 153 - Sometimes I meete them like a man ; Sometimes an ox, sometimes a hound ; And to a horse I turn me can ; To trip and trot about them round.
Page 237 - OH, happy shades — to me unblest ! Friendly to peace, but not to me ! How ill the scene that offers rest, And heart that cannot rest, agree...
Page 11 - Dick had the cohuleen driuth in his hand, and was about to give it back to the Merrow, who looked covetously at it, but he thought for a moment, and then, says he — " Please your reverence, she's a king's daughter." " If she was the daughter of fifty kings," said Father Fitzgibbon, " I tell you, you can't marry her, she being a fish.
Page 14 - Vainly she implored the restitution of her property : the man had drunk deeply of love, and was inexorable, but offered her protection beneath his roof as his betrothed spouse. The Merlady perceiving that she must become an inhabitant of the earth, found that she could not do better than accept of the offer. This strange...
Page 40 - Merrows cooking. His host then led him into the room, which was furnished shabbily enough. Not a table or a chair was there in it ; nothing but planks and logs of wood to sit on, and eat off. There was, however, a good fire Hazing on the hearth — a comfortable sight to Jack. " Come now, and I 'll show you where I keep — you know what...
Page 62 - One cause can detain me — one only — 'tis death!" They parted in sorrow, with vows true and fond; The language of promise had nothing beyond. His soul all on fire, with anxiety burns: The moment is gone — but no maiden returns. What sounds from the deep meet his terrified ear — What accents of rage and of grief does he hear? What sees he? what change has come over the flood — What tinges its green with a jetty of blood? Can he doubt what the gush of warm blood would explain ? That she sought...
Page 26 - True," replied another, with a voice still more fearful, "our king would never have commanded his gnawing white-toothed waves to devour the rocky roots of the island cemetery, had not his daughter, Durfulla, been buried there by her mortal husband ! "
Page 201 - J once," continues Mr. Townsend, " saw his skill tried on a horse which could never before be brought to stand for a smith to shoe him. The day after Sullivan's half-hour lecture...
Page 25 - It was certainly a solemn sight to behold the black coffin resting upon the white strand. His imagination gradually converted the deep moaning of old ocean into a mournful wail for the dead, and from the shadowy recesses of the rocks he imaged forth strange and visionary forms. As the night advanced, Connor became weary with watching ; he caught himself more than once in the fact of nodding, when suddenly giving his head a shake, he would look towards the black coffin. But the narrow house of death...
Page 292 - Cuddy had scarcely uttered these words, when he saw, or fancied he saw, the form of a young woman, who, holding up a bottle, beckoned him towards her. The night was extremely beautiful, and the white dress of the girl floated gracefully in the moonlight as with gay step shetriped on before the worthy father, archly looking back upon him over her shoulder.

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