Wasteland: The Great War and the Origins of Modern Horror

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Counterpoint Press, Oct 16, 2018 - Performing Arts - 209 pages
Historian and Bram Stoker Award Nominee W. Scott Poole traces the confluence of military history, technology, and art that gave us modern horror films and literature.

From Nosferatu to Frankenstein’s monster, from Fritz Lang to James Whale, the touchstones of horror can all trace their roots to the bloodshed of the First World War. Bram Stoker Award nominee W. Scott Poole traces the confluence of military history, technology, and art in the wake of World War I to show how overwhelming carnage gave birth to a wholly new art form: modern horror films and literature.

"Thoroughly engrossing cultural study . . . Poole persuasively argues that the birth of horror as a genre is rooted in the unprecedented destruction and carnage of WWI." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 

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User Review  - richardderus - LibraryThing

I made 65 notes on this book and never wrote the review! That's terrible. A waste of note-taking not to use them for their intended purpose. I enjoyed this fluid, fluent recounting of the modern ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

The problem with this work is that it feels rather scattershot in that while Poole draws interesting links between a disparate array of cultural figures, when was the last time you can remember Franz ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Afterword
Acknowledgments

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About the author (2018)

W. SCOTT POOLE is a professor of history at the College of Charleston who teaches and writes about horror and popular culture. His past books include the award-winning Monsters in America and the biography Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror. He is a Bram Stoker Award nominee for his critically acclaimed biography of H. P. Lovecraft, In the Mountains of Madness.

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