The Physiological anatomy and physiology of man

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Blanchard and Lea, 1857 - 926 pages
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Page 90 - altogether free from fat; but in prisons and gaols it appears as a puffiness in the inmates, fed, as they are, on a poor and scanty diet ; it appears in the sedentary females of oriental countries; and, finally, it is produced under the well-known conditions of the fattening of domestic animals.
Page 752 - compared the areas of trunks and branches in the only sound way, namely, according to the geometrical law, that the areas of circles are as the squares of their diameters. Estimated thus, he found that the excess of the combined areas of the branches over those of the trunks was very trifling, and, in some
Page 219 - if there be reasons for supposing that magnetism is a higher relation of force than electricity, so it may well be imagined that the nervous power may be of a still more exalted character, and yet within the reach of experiment.
Page 756 - That if two liquids communicate with one another in a capillary tube, or in a porous or parenchymatous structure, and have for that tube or structure different chemical affinities, movement will ensue; that liquid, which has the most energetic
Page 614 - the smaller, it will be found to pass out at the digested ends of the vessels, and to appear like drops on the inner surface."* Hunter remarked that solution of the stomach is very commonly found in fishes, which almost always die a violent death, and frequently during
Page 372 - to or subtract from one of them a certain quantity without the person being able to appreciate the change: and that when the parts bearing the weights, as the hands, are inactively resting upon a table, a much greater alteration may be made in the relative amount of the
Page 893 - male urethra is the canal which extends from the neck of the bladder to the end of the penis. It is about eight inches and a half in length, but varies slightly in different cases. The tube itself is
Page 372 - in general, depends on those of estimating, separately and in concert, both pressure on the tactile organ and the amount of contractile energy acting in the muscles. Weber performed experiments to ascertain how far we are capable of judging of weight by the mere sense of contact. He found that when two equal weights, every
Page 348 - from without. Under the name of common or general sensibility may be included a variety of internal sensations, ministering for the most part to the organic functions and to the conservation of the body. Most parts of the frame have their several feelings of comfort and pleasure,
Page 372 - of the greater surface affected (by the counter pressure against the support) in the former than in the latter case. Weber infers that the measure of weight by the mere touch of the skin is more than doubled by the play of the muscles. We believe this estimate to be rather under than over the mark.

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