Critical Race Theory: An Introduction

Front Cover
NYU Press, Apr 1, 2001 - Law - 167 pages
16 Reviews

While the United States was dominant in the development of psychology for much of the twentieth century, other countries have experienced significant growth in this area since the end of World War II. The percentage of those in the discipline who live and work in the United States has been growing smaller, and it is now impossible to completely understand the field if developments in psychology outside of the United States are ignored.

Internationalizing the History of Psychology brings together luminaries in the field from around the world to address the internationalizing of psychology, each raising core issuesconcerning what an international perspective can contributeto the history of psychology and to our understanding of psychology as a whole. For too long, much of what we havetaken to be the history of psychology has actually been thehistory of American psychology. This volume, ideal for student use and for those in the field, illuminates how what we have been missing may change our views of the nature of psychology and its history.

Contributors: Ruben Ardila, Geoffrey Blowers, Adrian C. Brock, Kurt Danziger, Aydan Gulerce, John D. Hogan, Naomi Lee, Johann Louw, Fathali M. Moghaddam, Anand C. Paranjpe, Irmingard Staeuble, Cecilia Taiana, and Thomas P. Vaccaro.

 

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Review: Critical Race Theory: An Introduction

User Review  - Drick - Goodreads

CRT is the dominant model for understanding issue of race and power and in this brief book the authors, but CRT experts, give a readable overview. They include the major themes, and some of the ... Read full review

Review: Critical Race Theory: An Introduction

User Review  - John Gillespie - Goodreads

Interesting introduction raises a lot of questions. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
A What Is Critical Race Theory?
2
B Early Origins
3
C Relationship to Other Movements
4
D Principal Figures
5
E Spinoff Movements
6
G How Much Racism Is There in the World?
9
H Organization of This Book
11
Questions and Comments for Chapter IV
64
Suggested Readings
65
Power and the Shape of Knowledge
67
B Critical White Studies
74
Classroom Exercise
80
Latino and Asian Critical Thought Critical Race Feminism QueerCrit Theory
81
Questions and Comments for Chapter V
84
Suggested Readings
85

Questions and Comments for Chapter I
13
Suggested Readings
14
Hallmark Critical Race Theory Themes
15
A Interest Convergence Material Determinism and Racial Realism
16
B Revisionist History
20
C Critique of Liberalism
21
D Structural Determinism
25
1 Tools of Thought and the Dilemma of Law Reform
26
2 The Empathic Fallacy
27
Classroom Exercise
29
3 Serving Two Masters
30
4 Race Remedies Law as a Homeostatic Device
31
Questions and Comments for Chapter II
33
Suggested Readings
34
Legal Storytelling and Narrative Analysis
37
A Opening a Window onto Ignored or Alternative Realities
39
B Counter story telling
42
C Cure for Silencing
43
D Storytelling in Court
45
E Storytelling on the Defensive
46
Questions and Comments for Chapter III
47
Suggested Readings
48
Looking Inward
51
B Essentialism and AntiEssentialism
56
C Nationalism versus Assimilation
59
Classroom Exercise
63
Critiques and Responses to Criticism
87
Classroom Exercise
95
Questions and Comments for Chapter VI
97
Suggested Readings
98
Critical Race Theory Today
101
B Capitalism on the Rampage
102
1 Unmasking Color Blindness
103
2 Race Class Welfare and Poverty
107
3 Globalization
111
C Power
113
D Identity
120
Classroom Exercise
121
Questions and Comments for Chapter VII
123
Suggested Readings
125
Conclusion
129
B A Critical Race Agenda for the New Century
131
C Likely Responses to Critical Race Theory
133
2 Critical Race Theory Marginalized and Ignored
134
4 Partial Incorporation
135
Questions and Comments for Chapter VIII
137
Suggested Readings
138
Glossary of Terms
141
Index
157
About the Authors
167
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Richard Delgado is Professor of Law at Seattle University and has collaborated on four previous books, including The Latino Condition, 2d edition (NYU Press, 2010), The Derrick Bell Reader (NYU Press, 2005), How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds, and Understanding Words That Wound.

Jean Stefancic is Research Professor of Law at Seattle University and is the author of many articles and books on civil rights, law reform, social change, including No Mercy: How Conservative Think Tanks and Foundations Changed America’s Social Agenda.

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