The epics of Hesiod, with an Engl. comm. by F.A. Paley

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1861
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Page 24 - while one of the chief evils specifically was the withdrawal of fire. Virgil evidently had this in view, Georg, i. 121—131 ¡ ' Pater ipse colendi Haud facilem esse viam voluit, primusque per artem Movit agros, curis acuens mortalia corda.—Mellaque decussit foliis
Page 40 - Sensum expressit Livius, xxii. 29, laudatus Graevio : — ' Saepe ego audivi, milites, eum primum esse virum (ie maxima laude dignum) qui ipse polleat ingenio, ut consulere sibi optime possit, qui ipse consulat, quid in rem sit; secundum eum, qui bene monenti obediat; qui nee ipse consulere nee alteri parère sciât,
Page 14 - \vypi, while one of the chief evils specifically was the withdrawal of fire. Virgil evidently had this in view, Georg, i. 121—131 ; ' Pater ipse colendi Haud facilem esse viam voluit, primusque per artem Movit agros, curis acuens mortalia corda.—Mellaque decussit foliis
Page 164 - 469 we also have the verse which here precedes (58), and neither is likely to be genuine in this passage.—It may be remarked however that the old year of ten months appears here to be indicated. Cf. Ovid, Fast. i. 33, ' Quod satis est, utero matris dum prodeat infans, Hoc anno statuit temporis esse satis.
Page 46 - peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just and fear not. ' Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's and
Page 125 - 142. Electrum was an alloy of gold and silver: see .sup. 122. Virg. Aen. viii. 401, ' Quicquid in arte mea possum promittere curae, Quod fieri ferro liquidove potest electro,
Page 125 - As compared with the Homeric description of the shield of Achilles, in the eighteenth book of the Iliad, this account of the shield of Hercules is characterised rather by terror than by the peaceful and rural scenes which the other for the
Page 34 - Et durae quercus sudabunt roscida mella.' Tibullus, i. 3, 45, 'Ipsae mella dabant quercus, ultroque ferebant Obvia securis ubera lactis oves.' But some of the ancients appear to have interpreted this of what is called honey-dew, which is really a deposit from the exudation of sap through the stomates of the leaves.
Page 182 - ante ipsum, primisque in faucibus Orci, Luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae ; Pallentesque habitant Morbi, tristisque Senectus,
Page 97 - Fas et jura sinunt : rivos deducere nulla Religio vetuit, segeti praetendere sepem,' &c. Hesiod therefore says that they are sacred days, but yet that secular works are permissible

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