Beautiful Birds in Far-off Lands: Their Haunts and Homes

Front Cover
T. Nelson, 1873 - Birds - 269 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - ... steeple. Quite deep in the forest, they grow so thick together, and there are so many shrubs, that no one can get through, except it is the Indian, for he can make his way where a white man cannot. Do you see those curious plants that hang down from the branches of the trees like cords or streamers ? They are called vegetable cables, because they are so much like ropes. They wind round and round the trees for miles and miles. The monkeys run along them merrily. Great rivers run through the forest....
Page 11 - ... There are a great many curious things to be seen in the forest. In the deepest gloom, where the trees shut out the sun, myriads of lights flit about, and twinkle like little stars. They flash here and there, and you might fancy that troops of fairies were carrying torches in their hands ; but there are no fairies in the case, — the lights are only the torches of the fire-flies that live in the recesses of the wood, and every night make a kind of illumination amongst the trees. Then there are...
Page 239 - ... which our present species and one or two following represent. They are called by the French, Coquets ; and Lesson has formed from them a genus, Lophornis, including this with the three following and some other species. In this bird, in addition to an ample crest of clear reddish chestnut upon the head, the sides of the neck are adorned with tufts of narrow feathers, almost an inch in length. They are composed of from ten to twenty plumes, of the same colour with the crest, and are terminated...
Page 11 - When night comes they roll themselves into a ball, all huddled together as close as may be, to keep themselves warm. Sometimes it happens that a few little monkeys have not been alert enough to get into the ball, and are left shivering outside. They keep up a pitiful howling the whole night through, telling the rest how cold and miserable they are, and begging to be let in.
Page 11 - Avild creatures of the forest wage war upon each other, and the weak are always using some contrivance to protect themselves from the strong. There are a great many curious things to be seen in the forest.
Page 66 - HOT. sleep. The chattering ceases, and the forest is still. But in the evening, when the sun is down, they wake up, and are as noisy and as lively as ever. They sup, as they breakfasted, upon the kernels of the fruits; and then they go to the water to bathe once more. Again follows the business of pluming* their feathers; and after this they go to rest for the night. But they do not roost* in the branches where they took their mid-day nap. Their sleeping-room is a hollow in a tree, scooped out by...
Page 66 - ... Again follows the business of pluming* their feathers; and after this they go to rest for the night. But they do not roost* in the branches where they took their mid-day nap. Their sleeping-room is a hollow in a tree, scooped out by the woodpecker. As many parrots go in as the hollow will contain. The rest hook themselves to the bark by their claws and bills, and hang there during the night. The parrot lays her eggs in these hollow trees. She does not make a nest, but is content with the soft...
Page 10 - Dangers of every kind lurk in the forest. The quick subtle Indian dare not venture without his poisoned arrow, or the white man without the thunder and lightning of his gun.
Page 10 - The venomous snake may lie coiled among the bushes, or traces of the savage jaguar be seen upon the path.

Bibliographic information