Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 26, 1998 - Nature - 478 pages
0 Reviews
In this book, field and laboratory researchers show that the Great Apes are capable of thinking at symbolic levels, traditionally considered uniquely human. They show these high-level abilities in both social and ecological domains, including tool use, imitation, pretense, self-awareness, deception, consolation, teaching and proto-culture itself. Here, contributors emphasize the mechanisms involved in building these abilities--especially the lengthy developmental and "enculturation" processes--suggesting changes to current views on how primate and human intelligence have evolved. Researchers and professionals in the fields of primatology, animal behavior, anthropology, linguistics, and cognitive psychology will find much useful information in this book.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Exploring the minds of the great apes Issues and controversies
1
The scope of great ape intelligence
21
Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys Comparative cognition
23
Acting and understanding Tool use revisited through the minds of capuchin monkeys
57
Consolation reconciliation and a possible cognitive difference between macaques and chimpanzees
80
The misunderstood ape Cognitive skills of the gorilla
111
Ostensive behavior in great apes The role of eye contact
131
Imitation in everyday use Matching and rehearsal in the spontaneous imitation of rehabilitant orangutans Pongo pygmaeus
152
Influences on development in infant chimpanzees Enculturation temperament and cognition
235
Heterochrony and the evolution of primate cognitive development
257
Simon says The development of imitation in an enculturated orangutan
278
Imitation pretense and mindreading Secondary representation in comparative primatology and developmental psychology?
300
Selfawareness and selfknowledge in humans apes and monkeys
325
Apprenticeship in toolmediated extractive foraging The origins of imitation teaching and selfawareness in great apes
348
The effect of humans on the cognitive development of apes
371
Three approaches for assessing chimpanzee culture
404

More is less The elicitation of rulegoverned resource distribution in chimpanzees
177
Toolusing behavior in wild Pan paniscus Social and ecological considerations
190
Comparison of chimpanzee material culture between Bossou and Nimba West Africa
211
Organization of great ape intelligence Development culture and evolution
233
On the wild side of culture and cognition in the great apes
430
Index
451
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information