History of the Society of Jesus in North America; colonial and federal, Volume 1

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Longmans, Green, 1908
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Page 341 - Not a ship arrives with redemptioners or convicts, in which schoolmasters are not as regularly advertised for sale, as weavers, tailors, or any other trade ; with little other difference, that I can hear of, excepting perhaps that the former do not usually fetch so good a price as the latter.
Page 243 - English law as is applicable to their own situation and the condition of an infant colony ; such for instance as the general rules of inheritance and of protection from personal injuries. The artificial refinements and distinctions incident to the property of a great and commercial people, the laws of police and revenue (such especially as are enforced by penalties) the mode of maintenance for the established clergy, the jurisdiction of spiritual courts, and a multitude of other provisions, are neither...
Page 237 - CHRIST), within the said region, islands, islets and limits aforesaid, hereafter shall happen to be built; together with license and faculty of erecting and founding churches, chapels and places of worship, in convenient and suitable places, within the premises, and of causing the same to be dedicated and consecrated according to the ecclesiastical laws of our kingdom of ENGLAND...
Page 283 - The answer of Henry Cromwell is as follows : — ' Concerning the supply of young men, although we must use force in taking them up, yet it being so much for their own good, and likely to be of so great advantage to the public, it is not...
Page 324 - This is the sweetest and greatest river I have scene, so that the Thames is but a little finger to it. There are noe marshes or swampes about it, but solid firme ground, with great variety of woode not choaked up with undershrubs, but commonly so farre distant from each other as a coach and fower horses may travale without molestation.
Page 608 - ... lest the gifts, intended to be employed upon purposes grounded upon charity, might in change of times (contrary to the minds of the givers) be confiscated into the king's treasury. For religion being variable, according to the pleasure of succeeding princes, that which at one time is held for orthodox, may at another be accounted superstitious, and then such lands are confiscated, as appears by the Statute of Chantries, 1 Edw.
Page 595 - But, when these dotations began to grow numerous, it was observed that the feodal services, ordained for the defence of the kingdom, were every day visibly withdrawn; that the circulation of landed property from man to man began to stagnate ; and that the lords were curtailed of the fruits of their seigniories, their escheats, wardships, reliefs, and the like...
Page 93 - Such excessive severities under the pretext of treason, but sustained by very little evidence of any other offence than the exercise of the Catholic ministry, excited indignation throughout a great part of Europe.
Page 451 - I AB do truly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, testify and declare in my Conscience, before God and the World, That our Sovereign Lord King George is lawful and rightful King of this Realm, and all other his Majesty's Dominions and Countries thereunto belonging.
Page 86 - But this law, though still sacred in the courts of justice, was set aside by the privy council under the Tudor line. The rack seldom stood idle in the Tower for all the latter part of Elizabeth's reign...

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