Pickwick papers

Front Cover
Ticknor and Fields, 1866
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
24
IV
40
V
55
VI
72
VII
97
VIII
113
XVI
225
XVII
239
XVIII
256
XIX
267
XX
280
XXI
294
XXII
312
XXIII
328

IX
125
X
139
XI
153
XII
169
XIII
182
XIV
196
XV
211
XXIV
343
XXV
356
XXVI
370
XXVII
386
XXVIII
399
XXIX
412

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Page 18 - Mr. Winkle, stooping forward with his body half doubled up, was being assisted over the ice by Mr. Weller, in a very singular and un-swanlike manner, when Mr. Pickwick most innocently shouted from the opposite bank, — '"Sam!' '"Sir?' said Mr. Weller. '"Here, I want you.
Page 91 - Here a voice in the gallery exclaimed aloud, " Quite right too, Samivel ; quite right. Put it down a we, my Lord, put it down a we.
Page 60 - Tain't in poetry, is it?' interposed the father. ' No, no,' replied Sam. 'Werry glad to hear it,' said Mr. Weller. 'Poetry's unnat'ral ; no man ever talked in poetry 'cept a beadle on boxin...
Page 81 - ... at Mrs. Bardell's house. I shall show you that Mrs. Bardell, during the whole of that time, waited on him, attended to his comforts, cooked his meals, looked out his linen for the washer-woman when it went abroad, darned, aired, and prepared it for wear, when it came home, and, in short, enjoyed his fullest trust and confidence. I shall show you, that, on many occasions, he gave halfpence, and on some occasions even sixpences, to her little boy; and I shall prove to you, by a witness, whose testimony...
Page 81 - ... to their solemn contract ; and I am in a situation to prove to you, on the testimony of three of his own friends — most unwilling witnesses, gentlemen — most unwilling witnesses — that on that morning he was discovered by them holding the plaintiff in his arms, and soothing her agitation by his caresses and endearments.
Page 17 - Hold up, Sir." This last observation of Mr. Weller's bore reference to a demonstration Mr. Winkle made at the instant, of a frantic desire to throw his feet in the air, and dash the back of his head on the ice. "These — these — are very awkward skaits; ain't they, Sam? " inquired Mr. Winkle, staggering. "I'm afeerd there's a orkard gen'lm'n in 'em, Sir," replied Sam. "Now, Winkle,
Page 82 - ... sensitive and confiding female to be trifled away, by such shallow artifices as these ? The next has no date whatever, which is in itself suspicious. — ' Dear Mrs. B., I shall not be at home till to-morrow. Slow coach.' And then follows this very remarkable expression — ' Don't trouble yourself about the warming-pan.
Page 79 - Mr. Bardell was a man of his word, Mr. Bardell was no deceiver, Mr. Bardell was once a single gentleman himself; to single gentlemen I look for protection, for assistance, for comfort, and for consolation ; in single gentlemen I shall perpetually see something to remind me of what Mr.
Page 79 - I look for protection, for assistance, for comfort, and for consolation; in single gentlemen I shall perpetually see something to remind me of what Mr. Bardell was, when he first won my young and untried affections. To a single gentleman, then, shall my lodgings be let.
Page 91 - I never had occasion to spell it more than once or twice in my life, but I spells it with a

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