M. Tullii Ciceronis Orationes selectae, Volume 1

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Hahn, 1846 - 446 pages
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Page xxviii - Dr. B. The attendants, as soon as the soldiers appeared, prepared themselves for action, being resolved to defend their master's life at the hazard of their own ; but Cicero commanded them to set down the litter in which they were conveying him, and to make no resistance...
Page 282 - Their fleets were not only extremely well manned, supplied with skilful pilots, and fitted for their business by their lightness and celerity ; but there was a parade of vanity about them, more mortifying than their strength, in gilded sterns, purple canopies, and plated oars : as if they took a pride...
Page 49 - Etenim omnes artes, quae ad humanitatem pertinent, habent quoddam commune vinculum ; et, quasi cognatione quadam, inter se continentur.
Page 357 - Declamatory accusations rather than assiduously paying court to the people," ie angry denunciations against rival candidates, and accusations of bribery, when one ought to be going round and soliciting votes. — The old reading was salutatio, until changed by Gruter to the present one, which is much stronger, and is equivalent to assidua salutatio. — For a long time before the day of election, the candidates endeavoured to gain the favour of the people by every popular art, by going round to their...
Page 172 - On each couch there were commonly three. They lay with the upper part of the body reclined on the left arm, the head a little raised, the back supported by cushions, (pnlvini, v. -illi). and the limbs stretched out at full length, or a little bent...
Page 11 - ... clarissimi cives Saturnini et Gracchorum et Flacci et superiorum complurium sanguine non modo se non contaminarunt, sed etiam honestarunt, certe verendum mihi non erat, ne quid hoc parricida civium interfecto invidiae mihi in posteritatem redundaret.
Page 55 - Atqui sic a summis hominibus eruditissimisque accepimus, ceterarum rerum studia et doctrina et praeceptis et arte constare, poe'tam natura ipsa valere et mentis viribus excitari et quasi divino quodam spiritu inflari.
Page 297 - Octavius, one of his own lieutenants, whom he sent to take the command. Octavius went in among the besieged, and fought on their side ; a circumstance, says Plutarch, which rendered Pompey not only odious but ridiculous. Metellus, however, pursued his operations, till he took the pirates, and put them all to death. As for Octavius, he exposed him in the camp as an object of contempt, and loaded him with reproaches, after which he dismissed him. (Plut. Vit. Pomp. c. 29.) 3. Apparavit. "Prepared for.
Page 269 - Cilo, afier supper, and had received two wounds, the one in his stomach, the other in his head near the ear ; but he was in hopes still that he might live; that Magius presently killed himself; and that Marcellus sent him to inform me of the case, and to desire that I would bring some physicians to him. I got some together immediately, and went away with them before break of day. But when I was come near the Piraeus, Alcidinus's boy met me with a note from his master, in which it was signified, that...

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