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SUGGESTIONS FOR

A PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PROGRAM FOR SMALL

SECONDARY SCHOOLS

ARRANGED WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF THE PROBLEMS

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION WHICH FACE THE LOCAL SCHOOL

OFFICIALS WHERE THERE IS NO DIRECTOR OF

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

By

WALTER F. COBB

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HYGIENE
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

and

DOROTHY HUTCHINSON

JUNIOR SPECIALIST IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. BUREAU OF
EDUCATION. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Physical Education Series No. 3

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF EDUCATION

1923

ADDITIONAL COPIES

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS

GOVERNMENT PRINTIXG OFFICE

WASHINGTON, D. C.

AT

10 CENTS PEE COPY

PURCHASER AGREES NOT TO RESELL OR DISTRIBUTE THIS COPY FOR PROFIT.—PUR. RES. 57, APPROVED MAY 11, 1922

FOREWORD.

Physical education is not a new activity that is being thrust into the school. It is an old activity—as old as the history of education— but so organized that it has its proper place in the curriculum of the school, and is making for a healthier school program as well as for healthier students.

In theory, educators believe that health is more important than wealth of knowledge; in actual practice, however, they rarely follow this belief. The problem in physical education is to conserve and promote health through systematic motor activity.

Recreational activities offered at school tend to affect the entire life of the individual. Habits of outdoor recreation and wholesome leisure time activities are fostered and promoted.

Recreation and moral conduct are closely related. More and more the individual will behave a-right,not so much because there is someone watching and checking up his behavior, as because right ideals and interests have been built into his life from earliest childhood.1

Therefore, any means which may help to make our boys and girls physically, mentally, and morally fit now, and physically, mentally, and morally fit for their future duties as citizens of their country, should be encouraged and promoted.

In any physical education program the activities should be so conducted as to promote the following necessary qualifications for citizenship:

1. Health, strength, and efficiency.

2. Satisfying and intelligent interest in active exercise.

3. A social sense, including qualities such as subordination, selfsacrifice, cooperation, loyalty, initiative, leadership, sportsmanship, and respect for the rights of others.

This bulletin is offered as a guide particularly for use in small high schools where there is no director of physical education and where the principal and teachers are endeavoring to organize a physical education program for their boys and girls.

Someone has very truly said that—

With the adolescent group the basal virtues are caught through the inspiring personality of teachers during their direction of activities more often than they are taught through definite moral instruction in the classroom. If the "win at any cost" idea dominates the coach, he may be the most potent factor in the community in destroying the moral ideals and the ethical standards of future leaders.

'Morgan, J. E. Facing the Recreation Problem. Child Welfare Magazine, March, 1923.

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